Who needed high idle?

I need to do that
 
Did it on my ‘15, need to do it to the Tremor. I keep saying I’ll do it once I dig into wiring something else in.
 
This is my first diesel…. Why would I want the ability to raise the idle, and what criteria makes the choice to what RPM it’s raised too?
 
This is my first diesel…. Why would I want the ability to raise the idle, and what criteria makes the choice to what RPM it’s raised too?
Same here. 1st diesel.. some googling led me to the link below. Makes sense. Something else to do now. Winter months cometh.
The reason for this on pre-tier 4 engines is because diesel's do not make much heat at idle. Ie: If you take a series B Cummins and let it idle, it will burn a tank of fuel and the thermostat will still not be open. Running cold like this is not good for the engine...

this one as well, but more for the bigger rigs.
https://www.irv2.com/forums/f123/high-idle-when-to-use-and-why-307385.html

The purpose for high idle is to avoid a condition called wet stacking. An engine at idle does not create high enough cylinder temps to atomize the entire amount of fuel being injected into each cylinder causing the unburned fuel to mix with, and wash down the oil from the cylinder wall, thus dilluting the engine oil with diesel fuel and causing excessive engine wear. All class 8 and 6 engines have had the ability to raise the idle through the use of the cruise control since their conversion to electronic engine controls, and most manufacturers recomend a minimum of 1,000 rpm for extended or prolonged engine idle periods. On my 06 automatic truck, when the temps are low enough it will idle up to 1000 rpm after 3 minutes at base idle, or I can engage the high idle by pressing the cruise button on then pressing the resume/set side, it will instantly jump to 1,100 rpm, if I continue to hold the resume/set button the engine rpm will continue to rise to 1,500 rpm and stay there until I disengage the cruise with the on/off button, or step on the brake.

After a couple of minutes after starting, oil pressure up on gauge, I have always raise the RPM'S up to 900-1000 ............even in cold weather back when I drove OTR...........
The big Cummins in my semi's sat and ran at 900-1000 all night.........if I did not idle them up in cold winter weather = No Heat for the over night rest........
 
I used the high idle kit to keep the AC blowing cold and strong for my dog in Texas last weekend with temps around 100. I set it at 1000 and came back 40 minutes or so later and the truck was nice and cold. My truck (diesel) idles at 600. The high idle I have starts at 900 and goes to 3000rpm’s. 900 didn’t seem to change the output of the AC but 1000 did.
 
Same here. 1st diesel.. some googling led me to the link below. Makes sense. Something else to do now. Winter months cometh.
The reason for this on pre-tier 4 engines is because diesel's do not make much heat at idle. Ie: If you take a series B Cummins and let it idle, it will burn a tank of fuel and the thermostat will still not be open. Running cold like this is not good for the engine...

this one as well, but more for the bigger rigs.
https://www.irv2.com/forums/f123/high-idle-when-to-use-and-why-307385.html

The purpose for high idle is to avoid a condition called wet stacking. An engine at idle does not create high enough cylinder temps to atomize the entire amount of fuel being injected into each cylinder causing the unburned fuel to mix with, and wash down the oil from the cylinder wall, thus dilluting the engine oil with diesel fuel and causing excessive engine wear. All class 8 and 6 engines have had the ability to raise the idle through the use of the cruise control since their conversion to electronic engine controls, and most manufacturers recomend a minimum of 1,000 rpm for extended or prolonged engine idle periods. On my 06 automatic truck, when the temps are low enough it will idle up to 1000 rpm after 3 minutes at base idle, or I can engage the high idle by pressing the cruise button on then pressing the resume/set side, it will instantly jump to 1,100 rpm, if I continue to hold the resume/set button the engine rpm will continue to rise to 1,500 rpm and stay there until I disengage the cruise with the on/off button, or step on the brake.

After a couple of minutes after starting, oil pressure up on gauge, I have always raise the RPM'S up to 900-1000 ............even in cold weather back when I drove OTR...........
The big Cummins in my semi's sat and ran at 900-1000 all night.........if I did not idle them up in cold winter weather = No Heat for the over night rest........
You are correct for 2006 and older engines... pre-Tier 4.

For newer engines, you need to raise the idle for exhaust temps to be high enough for an active regeneration to occur. There is just not enough temperature at idle, and you typically need 1000-1200 rpm to hit those limits with an air thottle active.

OTR trucks have known this and the feature you mentioned is an easy way to continue the practice.

HD pickups don't, thus why ford put the feature in place for their medium duty (F450+) trucks. (BTW, their previous "Blue Diamond" line had the cruise feature as they used Cummins ISBs on chassis built by Navistar).

They just do not put it in place for the F350s and under as a default, but enable their dealers and upfitters to add it as needed. All the ECU programming is there.
 
Want to call out the other really common reason for high idle on diesels, though it isn’t particularly relevant to folks on this forum, is when running power take-off attachments. For example, PTO hydraulic pumps needs a higher RPM to generate enough pressure to operate whatever is hooked to them (e.g. dump bed, lift bucket, etc).
 
You are correct for 2006 and older engines... pre-Tier 4.

For newer engines, you need to raise the idle for exhaust temps to be high enough for an active regeneration to occur. There is just not enough temperature at idle, and you typically need 1000-1200 rpm to hit those limits with an air thottle active.

OTR trucks have known this and the feature you mentioned is an easy way to continue the practice.

HD pickups don't, thus why ford put the feature in place for their medium duty (F450+) trucks. (BTW, their previous "Blue Diamond" line had the cruise feature as they used Cummins ISBs on chassis built by Navistar).

They just do not put it in place for the F350s and under as a default, but enable their dealers and upfitters to add it as needed. All the ECU programming is there.
Are you saying the cruise control option does not work on our Tremors, but can be enabled using something like Forscan? Or does a dealer have to do it?
 
Are you saying the cruise control option does not work on our Tremors, but can be enabled using something like Forscan? Or does a dealer have to do it?
The cruise feature that Countryguy mentioned was on commercial trucks (I worked for a Commercial truck OEM). You can set the idle speed with the cruise on all class 8 trucks that I drove(most were new and prototypes), and it has been around for a while as Countryguy mentioned.

As I understand it, there is no elevated idle feature available as delivered, but it requires switch and resistor jumper to be installed in the harness for it to be active. Ford does sell this to integrate with the harness for dealers and upfitters to install.

So, you need hardware to make it happen. ForScan won't get you there.
 
Want to call out the other really common reason for high idle on diesels, though it isn’t particularly relevant to folks on this forum, is when running power take-off attachments. For example, PTO hydraulic pumps needs a higher RPM to generate enough pressure to operate whatever is hooked to them (e.g. dump bed, lift bucket, etc).
Yup. Usually the ECM has a requested engine speed driven from the upfitter's controls. These inputs are available on Class 5+ medium duty trucks, but I have no idea how Ford communicates the protocols to the upfitters as most commercial trucks have a different CANBUS setup than my F250 (does Ford move to a different setup on the F450+?)
 
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