Two Air Compressors Stupid?

Bigzaj

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Ford Raptor
I've got full travel bags with the readylift compressor installed on my truck. I really want the ability to run a compressor to manage my tires and trailer tires. I'm considering adding an ARB Twin Compressor, but it seems stupid at first thought to run two compressors. What are people doing to run bags and tire inflate/deflate. I don't need to run tools so I was not planning on a tank.

Can I manifold / split the Readylift compressor to bags and airchuck?
Can I replace the Readylift with ARB twin compressor and do the same?
Easiest to just add an ARB in cab on in bed for filling tires?
 
The days of mounted air compressors, I'm afraid are coming to an end.

Even with dual compressors and a tank, nothing beats the portable dual cylinder compressors in today's market.

Just yesterday I aired up (4) of my 35" tires from 25 to 57 in less than 15 minutes, simultaneously with my Thor Lightning 12V unit.

It was also 106F outside.
 
I’ll also vouch for the Napa twin as well as the above sentiment. Filling up all four tires from 20 psi in minutes after a long day at the beach for less than 150 bucks is the life.
 
The days of mounted air compressors, I'm afraid are coming to an end.

Even with dual compressors and a tank, nothing beats the portable dual cylinder compressors in today's market.

Just yesterday I aired up (4) of my 35" tires from 25 to 57 in less than 15 minutes, simultaneously with my Thor Lightning 12V unit.

It was also 106F outside.
Ive read a lot of your posts. you use your truck a lot. (read: your thoughts/reasons carry a bit more weight, imo) Why go portable when you could hard mount and it always be there but not take up bed space, etc?
 
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I've got full travel bags with the readylift compressor installed on my truck. I really want the ability to run a compressor to manage my tires and trailer tires. I'm considering adding an ARB Twin Compressor, but it seems stupid at first thought to run two compressors. What are people doing to run bags and tire inflate/deflate. I don't need to run tools so I was not planning on a tank.

Can I manifold / split the Readylift compressor to bags and airchuck?
Can I replace the Readylift with ARB twin compressor and do the same?
Easiest to just add an ARB in cab on in bed for filling tires?
Personally, i am planning to hard-mount two air zeniths (100% duty) and tie up with a 5-6gal tank. I'll design some brackets to hold them above the spare and route the air intake to a custom air filter setup that i'll locate likely just forward of the pass rear tire.

Havent figured out the airbags yet b/c i dont have them yet. My last truck, i drilled out a license plate bolt and put a valve stem(?)/air up spot for them (tied together). Worked decently and was barely noticeable.
This truck i will likely isolate the bags. I am also going to pursue using actuated valves to airup/down the bags so i have control from the cab without running air lines to the cab.

*this is all subject to change when i actually get around to executing
 
Ive read a lot of your posts. you use your truck a lot. (read: your thoughts/reasons carry a bit more weight, imo) Why go portable when you could hard mount and it always be there but not take up bed space, etc?
Time is of the essence and it certainly is nothing agaisnt having it hard mounted.

Can I hard mount this portable unit on the rig? Certainly - I just haven't gotten around to it.

Personally, i am planning to hard-mount two air zeniths (100% duty) and tie up with a 5-6gal tank. I'll design some brackets to hold them above the spare and route the air intake to a custom air filter setup that i'll locate likely just forward of the pass rear tire.

Havent figured out the airbags yet b/c i dont have them yet. My last truck, i drilled out a license plate bolt and put a valve stem(?)/air up spot for them (tied together). Worked decently and was barely noticeable.
This truck i will likely isolate the bags. I am also going to pursue using actuated valves to airup/down the bags so i have control from the cab without running air lines to the cab.

*this is all subject to change when i actually get around to executing

I am not familiar with the air zeniths and how quick they are but if they're anything like the THOR, I like this set up, not to mention having the air coupler(s) ready available to plug into.

This would be ideal.
 
Time is of the essence and it certainly is nothing agaisnt having it hard mounted.

Can I hard mount this portable unit on the rig? Certainly - I just haven't gotten around to it.



I am not familiar with the air zeniths and how quick they are but if they're anything like the THOR, I like this set up, not to mention having the air coupler(s) ready available to plug into.

This would be ideal.
Time... makes sense.

AZs are decently quick but they are meant to be hard-mounted w/ air lines routed, etc. For someone who doesnt want to OR cant spend the time to hard mount... that Thor looks like a darn good solution... especially if you airing up all 4 tires only uses half its duty cycle.
Thanks for sharing the gear you use.
 
The days of mounted air compressors, I'm afraid are coming to an end.

Even with dual compressors and a tank, nothing beats the portable dual cylinder compressors in today's market.

Just yesterday I aired up (4) of my 35" tires from 25 to 57 in less than 15 minutes, simultaneously with my Thor Lightning 12V unit.

It was also 106F outside.
I keep hesitating with that compressor. Well, the Morrflate compressor; your post was the first I've heard of Thor's lightning. But it appears to be the same compressor.

That compressor appears to be a Chinese special being sold under a ton of brands:
(There's more, but I got tired of copying/pasting/editing links.)

Then I read on Thor's Lighting product page: "TotalControl technology was designed in-house at our facility in Colorado in 2022." But that same feature is available on Morrflate's compressor, so is Thor's Lightning the original manufacturer and Morrflate is buying from them?

I then read on Morrflate's site a bunch of upgrades they've done and claim are unique to Morrflate, including "internal aluminum cylinders", and "new piston rings". Those are some pretty foundational things, but would Thor's Lightning make those modifications exclusive to Morrflate if they are the manufacturer and selling their now inferior compressor directly?

Sounds like you've had good luck with it? Any concerns about reliability?
 
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I have two on my truck. The AirLift compressor is dedicated to the airbags and used with the included fob. I like the convenience of adjusting the airbags on the fly with its own contained system. It's a small compressor explicitly designed for that purpose. I also have the ARB twin mounted behind the back passenger seat on the Dirt Church mount. That kit has two connections, one for each side of the truck. So far, it's been great.
 
Any reason over using a Power Tank setup?? I'd think overall size is a factor, but what am I missing?
 
Time... makes sense.

AZs are decently quick but they are meant to be hard-mounted w/ air lines routed, etc. For someone who doesnt want to OR cant spend the time to hard mount... that Thor looks like a darn good solution... especially if you airing up all 4 tires only uses half its duty cycle.
Thanks for sharing the gear you use.
Just looked them up - it's commonly what Horn Blasters uses for their set up and they're also not slow by any means. The price says it all for the dual unit set up.

The portable unit I have puts out 10.6 CFM and like I said earlier, it's quick! I love the fact I can inflate all 4 tires at the same time.

The only problem I would by have by hard mounting it is that I would loose the ability to see the screen which displays the settings of the compressor. After all, the idea is not to have it in the cargo area but underneat the truck somwhere?
I keep hesitating with that compressor. Well, the Morrflate compressor; your post was the first I've heard of Thor's lightning. But it appears to be the same compressor.

That compressor appears to be a Chinese special being sold under a ton of brands:
(There's more, but I got tired of copying/pasting/editing links.)

Then I read on Thor's Lighting product page: "TotalControl technology was designed in-house at our facility in Colorado in 2022." But that same feature is available on Morrflate's compressor, so is Thor's Lightning the original manufacturer and Morrflate is buying from them?

I then read on Morrflate's site a bunch of upgrades they've done and claim are unique to Morrflate, including "internal aluminum cylinders", and "new piston rings". Those are some pretty foundational things, but would Thor's Lightning make those modifications exclusive to Morrflate if they are the manufacturer and selling their now inferior compressor directly?

Sounds like you've had good luck with it? Any concerns about reliability?

You're a master when it comes to research - excellent pieces of information and certainly leaves you wondering on who is who and what is what?

The reason I went with Thor was the ability to inflate 1 or 4 tires up whereas a few of the above specifically indicate it will not work if only trying to air one tire at a time and mostly importantly, Thor matches my '22 in rapid red :D

The only problem I have ran into was that it got hot on me a few weeks ago. HOWEVER, it wasn't the compressors fault by any means. It was all the operator's fault since one of the air chucks (it uses a locking air chuck system) had been leaking during the entire air-up process. Since it uses a 4-tire air hose system, all other tires had been aired up to their target pressure but due to the leaky air chuck, the compressor was still running in an effort to get the last tire up to its set lbs. After more than 30 minutes, it shut off and read HOT on the display. Stunned I was especially since it was only a mild 113F degrees outside, so I let it rest but really got me thinking, what was taking soo long this time (not the first time using it). Upon further inspection it turns out that the air chuck had not been locked properly (truck engine was idling the entire time so it hard to pick up the hissing sound from the air chuck leak).

She rested for a few minutes, properly locked the air chuck on the last tire and it finished airing it up within a few minutes.

You can also use the 4-tire air hose system to deflate but I rather use the Staun deflators.

Only time and use will tell how reliable they are but for now, it has inflated my tires everytime I have needed to in the short time I've owned the unit.

I would say I've used it a dozen times in 3 months.
 
Any reason over using a Power Tank setup?? I'd think overall size is a factor, but what am I missing?
While power tanks are great and super quick, for me it's the size.

I still have and use power tanks on special trips but during COVID, it was hard to get them refilled so I opted for the compressor and haven't looked back.
 
I'll throw my .02 in. I opted for a hard mount ARB twin on a Builtright panel in the bed. i understand that my case isn't for everybody, but i also have a camper shell so I'm not really worried about theft or being out in the elements. I chose hard mounting because if it was portable it would be taking up space in my truck anyways. Being hard mounted it's fairly out of the way and still readily available when I need it. My thought was if it were a portable unit, it would take up space/float around in the back seat or in a box in the bed, and to me, it would just be in the way for how little it was used.

I almost never need an air pump away from the truck, but if I do, my work was nice enough to buy me an M12 tire inflator that I can use for small backyard stuff.
 
I used an ARB duel compressor with a three-gallon air tank and mounted them both above the spare tire. I used this to control the airbag air: https://www.amazon.com/CNRAQR-Universal-Suspension-Controller-Pneumatic/dp/B08Z3HRPFT?th=
I mounted an electronic air gauge in the console to keep track of the air in each bag and the air in the tank. I ran a line to an ARB air chuck mounted beside the license plate for airing up tires and the goosebox hitch on my fifth-wheel. I had a viair compressor on my last truck and the the ARB is at least three to four times faster than that compressor. I camp on the beach three to four times a year and have to air down the ruck and fifth-wheel tires to 20psi to keep from getting stuck. I can air all eight tires up in a little over 30 minutes of continuous use with the ARB compressor.
 
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The reason I went with Thor was the ability to inflate 1 or 4 tires up whereas a few of the above specifically indicate it will not work if only trying to air one tire at a time and mostly importantly, Thor matches my '22 in rapid red :D
That is a really interesting distinction between brands. I will say, support is going to be a huge difference between the brands, even if the hardware is identical. I trust Morrflate and Thor’s Lightning both to stand behind the compressor, particularly in edge cases, compared to the fly by night Amazon brands.

So perhaps Morrflate is being more conservative to reduce support costs?

The only problem I have ran into was that it got hot on me a few weeks ago. HOWEVER, it wasn't the compressors fault by any means. It was all the operator's fault since one of the air chucks (it uses a locking air chuck system) had been leaking during the entire air-up process. Since it uses a 4-tire air hose system, all other tires had been aired up to their target pressure but due to the leaky air chuck, the compressor was still running in an effort to get the last tire up to its set lbs. After more than 30 minutes, it shut off and read HOT on the display. Stunned I was especially since it was only a mild 113F degrees outside, so I let it rest but really got me thinking, what was taking soo long this time (not the first time using it). Upon further inspection it turns out that the air chuck had not been locked properly (truck engine was idling the entire time so it hard to pick up the hissing sound from the air chuck leak).
That’s a super interesting story and quite reassuring. Seems to have handled it exactly as it was supposed to.

I actually had a similar issue with regards to the leaky air chuck with my Morrflate hoses, though exact opposite weather. It didn’t seal correctly because it was jammed with snow. Had to fall back to the regular air hose that came with my compressor and thaw the Morrflate out at home.

No worries about the compressor overheating though given it was actively snowing lol. Also it’s a 100% duty cycle ViaAir (dramatically slower than your compressor, though; hence me thinking about the dual cylinder options).

Only time and use will tell how reliable they are but for now, it has inflated my tires everytime I have needed to in the short time I've owned the unit.

I would say I've used it a dozen times in 3 months.
Yep, time will ultimately tell. But that’s a pretty good track record so far, and some pretty significant usage compared to how often I’ll use it.

Really appreciate the details.
 
I highly recommend ordering a unit or units from Extreme Outback air compressor. Im not affiliated -- hell I dont even sell them (but I do sell and own some ARBs.)

The Extreme outback stuff is used heavily in military installations. Full duty cycle. The Endura line is 100% waterproof and can be mounted at any angle. The ARBs WILL burn out. Nearly every single person I know that works in the Overland Industry will switch to Extreme outback after their ARB burns up. If I didnt have an ARB twin laying around, I would have gone with either 2x enduras or 1x magnum from them.

If you are just doing airbags on the truck with the occasional tire or two, one endura would be perfect. I am airing up 37" tires weekly, so I would need more CFM.

If you want to save on cost and install time, you could just opt for a battery powered compressor from any of the big tool brands.
 
I've got full travel bags with the readylift compressor installed on my truck. I really want the ability to run a compressor to manage my tires and trailer tires. I'm considering adding an ARB Twin Compressor, but it seems stupid at first thought to run two compressors. What are people doing to run bags and tire inflate/deflate. I don't need to run tools so I was not planning on a tank.

Can I manifold / split the Readylift compressor to bags and airchuck?
Can I replace the Readylift with ARB twin compressor and do the same?
Easiest to just add an ARB in cab on in bed for filling tires?
Check out the extreme duty compressor here: https://www.extremeoutback.com/product-category/air-compressors/

I have had this on my F450 for about 2 years now, with a 4.5 gallon tank and it is a 100% duty rated with a quick refill time. It can be mounted anywhere and is 100% built to withstand elements.
 
This is a great question/thread, so I'll throw in my $0.02.

I've had a Jeep for years and used the ARB twin for a long time until swapping the drivetrain out for one ton axles with air lockers and 40" tires. At that point, I switched from the ARB to a Powertank set up and its been a really good fit for my use case - those 40s get full in seconds, not minutes. This freed up the ARB twin which then went into (under) my Super Duty to use for tires (truck tires, trailer tires, friends'' Jeeps, etc.) and air tools.

I also had a spare AirLift compressor sitting around from an another truck so I threw that onto my Super Duty as well to use only on airbags (Full Travel airbags). I don't have a lot of faith in the Airlift compressor as it is really exposed and super rusty after two years use but it still is going strong. If it does fail, I will probably reconsider my air set up (Logiq AirIQ or other compressor, maybe a tank).

However, for now, my dual air compressor set up works for my truck's use case - both are regularly in use but I like having dedicated systems that give me a backup in case of failure. Technically, I have a third backup with a Powertank in my Jeep if it ever came to that.

If I didn't have these parts already collecting dust in my garage, I doubt I would have gone with this set up but its been working for me so far.
 
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