Truck Campers Only, w/ an Overland & Off-roading theme

Has anyone heard of or had experience with the Skinnyguy camper? https://skinnyguycampers.com/
Never seen one in person but there’s lots of YouTube videos out there showing them. Tbh they look like a good fit for something like a Tacoma but you can probably be a lot more comfortable in a camper that you can carry on a Tremor. That said they do look pretty complete for a small light camper.
 
Not on the current Tremor but we tried two different flavors on our Power Wagon a few years back.

FWC Hawk with the Roll Over Couch layout. I loved it but it didn't have A/C and here in Texas that killed it for six or more months out of the year. I would love to have another FWC at some point in the future.



AT Overland Equipment Habitat. My wife loved this setup, the simplicity was undeniable and at the time it smoked everything else like it on the market in terms of build quality.

Would you say AC is a must for us folks in the Southeast, or could 1 or 2 MaxxAir fans in the roof be sufficient? So many of the owner reviews are in climates that don't have the humidity or condensation issues we see in wetter parts of the U.S.
 
Would you say AC is a must for us folks in the Southeast, or could 1 or 2 MaxxAir fans in the roof be sufficient? So many of the owner reviews are in climates that don't have the humidity or condensation issues we see in wetter parts of the U.S.

I survived it with just the two fans but I didn’t camp in it here in Texas in the hot summer months either for that very reason. If you plan to use it year round, especially in the summer in the south then IMHO it needs AC unless you’re a freak like my wife that’s still cold even when it’s 90F out.
 
IMG_0554.jpeg

Since I’m getting the new Supertramp installed in a couple days I figured I’d weigh on a CAT scale the before and after to see what and where the weight was added. This is obviously the before. Truck had a very full tank of gas, scale was like 800ft from the gas station. Besides that the tailgate was removed, my Hitch Easy Steps where installed, my wife and I were in the truck and the back seat was absolutely filled with camping gear for the next couple weeks. My GVWR is 11,499lbs and my front axle GAWR is 4800lbs and my rear GAWR is 7050lbs. TBH I am pretty surprised I’m already within 300lbs of the front axle rating. Guess I’m gonna have to hang some heavy shit behind the rear axle to lighten up the front. Anyway this is really just a data point to share with others on here.

F350 XLT Premium 7.3L
 
View attachment 135882
Since I’m getting the new Supertramp installed in a couple days I figured I’d weigh on a CAT scale the before and after to see what and where the weight was added. This is obviously the before. Truck had a very full tank of gas, scale was like 800ft from the gas station. Besides that the tailgate was removed, my Hitch Easy Steps where installed, my wife and I were in the truck and the back seat was absolutely filled with camping gear for the next couple weeks. My GVWR is 11,499lbs and my front axle GAWR is 4800lbs and my rear GAWR is 7050lbs. TBH I am pretty surprised I’m already within 300lbs of the front axle rating. Guess I’m gonna have to hang some heavy shit behind the rear axle to lighten up the front. Anyway this is really just a data point to share with others on here.

F350 XLT Premium 7.3L
What is the build weight on the sticker?
 
What is the build weight on the sticker?
IMG_9692.jpeg

Listed payload is 4214, and GVWR is 11,499 so 7285lbs is what Ford says it weighed.
 
That seemed high but you must have a lot of stuff 😎. My diesel is 8,000 lbs unloaded as built.
 
That seemed high but you must have a lot of stuff 😎. My diesel is 8,000 lbs unloaded as built.
Naw, I built mine to have the highest GVWR I could get. 4214 is the highest I’ve seen so far.
 
Since I’m getting the new Supertramp installed in a couple days I figured I’d weigh on a CAT scale the before and after to see what and where the weight was added. This is obviously the before. Truck had a very full tank of gas, scale was like 800ft from the gas station. Besides that the tailgate was removed, my Hitch Easy Steps where installed, my wife and I were in the truck and the back seat was absolutely filled with camping gear for the next couple weeks. My GVWR is 11,499lbs and my front axle GAWR is 4800lbs and my rear GAWR is 7050lbs. TBH I am pretty surprised I’m already within 300lbs of the front axle rating. Guess I’m gonna have to hang some heavy shit behind the rear axle to lighten up the front. Anyway this is really just a data point to share with others on here.

F350 XLT Premium 7.3L

Thanks for the CAT weight. We'll do the same when our SD arrives and before, and after, we pick up our Supertramp. Weight adds up way faster than most people realize. Here is some info I'll poach from myself when I commented on an Overland Explorer Vehicle (OEV) CAMP-X thread and was asked about my experience with a CAMP-X on a Fullsize pickup. When folks get realistic with the weights, they realize that even these "light weight" slide-in pop-up pickup campers need to be on a SD/HD pickup; not a Fullsize.
-----------------------
Some info I've gathered or calculated:
A lot of loose estimates here in this first part because some have two 11lb tanks and some 20lb, some use AGM battery and some lithium, etc.
Approx dry weight of camper with fridge and no other options: 1260lb
20gallons of water: 166
House Battery: 40lb
Propane tanks full: 40lb
So you are at 1,500+lb before you even add food, camping supplies, tools, minor recovery gear, airbags and vehicle accessories, wiring, mounting brackets, etc.

Here are some real world numbers. We recently CAT weighed our rig on the way to a camping trip. With 2020 OEV CAMP-X slide-in pop-up camper (1,260lb dry/1,500+wet), food/camping supplies, tools, recovery gear and other things in the pickup, (but no people and no tongue weight):
2,105 lb. of real-world payload...And we pack light!
Now to that, add in total weight of all passengers (300lb for my wife and I) and it's 2,400lb payload.
Now add tongue weight (bike rack, cargo rack, trailer tongue weight, etc.)
100lb for MTB rack and two bikes and it's 2,500lb of total payload. Or, 300lb for our fishing boat or our enclosed powersports trailer tongue weight and it's 2,700lb total payload.

You can get your total payload weight over 2,500 - 3,000lbs very easily even packing light. This is way over max payload of the typical Fullsize, and especially midsize, pickups. Many people do Fullsize with this size camper, and we did for a time period, but realistically, this is SD/HD territory. The new camper will be heavier than our CAMP-X.

I'll be way more comfortable with the Superduty and we'll now be under max payload of truck and still have some leeway rather than being over (well over) max payload like I was on our Fullsize pickup and I would be on any modern, mid-trim level, 4x4 extended cab Fullsize pickup.
 
Thanks for the CAT weight. We'll do the same when our SD arrives and before, and after, we pick up our Supertramp. Weight adds up way faster than most people realize. Here is some info I'll poach from myself when I commented on an Overland Explorer Vehicle (OEV) CAMP-X thread and was asked about my experience with a CAMP-X on a Fullsize pickup. When folks get realistic with the weights, they realize that even these "light weight" slide-in pop-up pickup campers need to be on a SD/HD pickup; not a Fullsize.
-----------------------
Some info I've gathered or calculated:
A lot of loose estimates here in this first part because some have two 11lb tanks and some 20lb, some use AGM battery and some lithium, etc.
Approx dry weight of camper with fridge and no other options: 1260lb
20gallons of water: 166
House Battery: 40lb
Propane tanks full: 40lb
So you are at 1,500+lb before you even add food, camping supplies, tools, minor recovery gear, airbags and vehicle accessories, wiring, mounting brackets, etc.

Here are some real world numbers. We recently CAT weighed our rig on the way to a camping trip. With 2020 OEV CAMP-X slide-in pop-up camper (1,260lb dry/1,500+wet), food/camping supplies, tools, recovery gear and other things in the pickup, (but no people and no tongue weight):
2,105 lb. of real-world payload...And we pack light!
Now to that, add in total weight of all passengers (300lb for my wife and I) and it's 2,400lb payload.
Now add tongue weight (bike rack, cargo rack, trailer tongue weight, etc.)
100lb for MTB rack and two bikes and it's 2,500lb of total payload. Or, 300lb for our fishing boat or our enclosed powersports trailer tongue weight and it's 2,700lb total payload.

You can get your total payload weight over 2,500 - 3,000lbs very easily even packing light. This is way over max payload of the typical Fullsize, and especially midsize, pickups. Many people do Fullsize with this size camper, and we did for a time period, but realistically, this is SD/HD territory. The new camper will be heavier than our CAMP-X.

I'll be way more comfortable with the Superduty and we'll now be under max payload of truck and still have some leeway rather than being over (well over) max payload like I was on our Fullsize pickup and I would be on any modern, mid-trim level, 4x4 extended cab Fullsize pickup.

So…. Since we’re talking how heavy light weight campers still are..

What tire pressures were you running Offroad? Washboard roads? I would appreciate a place to start.
 
So…. Since we’re talking how heavy light weight campers still are..

What tire pressures were you running Offroad? Washboard roads? I would appreciate a place to start.

I tend to not go as low on pressure as most. True offroaders wouldn't even consider my pressures as "aired down". Ha. But even airing down a bit makes a huge difference. On previous pickup, I was 50lb to 65lb for highway driving depending on payload (camper on or off). I usually only air down to 34lb to 28lb. It is speed and terrain dependent. "Real" offroads don't consider anything over 15lbs to be aired down. But I'm in a pickup with camper; not in a dedicated rock crawler. Though my wife might disagree considering some of the places we end up. She gets out and walks at that point. Not to spot; just because she prefers to be outside the cab rather than in it when wheels start coming off the ground.

First thing I did was reach out to an engineer at Cooper tire and get their load rating chart for my specific tire and various air pressures. I knew what my loaded (with camper) and unloaded axle weights were. Max load rating, of a specific tire, varies with air temperature and is not linier. So I knew at what tire pressure I should be for highway driving at any given weight and set my air pressure to at least that (though usually give myself 300 - 500lb of leeway which is 3 - 5 lbs more air pressure).

For washboard roads, it really depends on the roads. Sometimes I don't air down at all, or just a bit, because I'm driving them 60+mph to smooth them out and keep the shocks cool. Hole-In-The-Rock trail, near Escalante, UT is a good example. 30 miles stretch of washboard to get into the slot canyons. The road has very few turns and is mostly very wide and straight. Traffic moves at two speeds because of how washboard the road is; 5 - 10mph or 40 - 70mph. Other gravel roads are tight and winding so airing down makes sense. And, it is way easier on a road surface or trail to be in 4hi rather than 2hi. Soap box alert: I hear too may saying "made it X far before needing 4hi" or "my truck makes it up that fine in 2hi". It's not about need. Switching to 4hi early is far less wear and tear on roads and trails because it keeps traction compared to a single axle and two contact patches on the edge of grip or losing traction on washboard bumps, which makes the washboard worse each time that happens. Even though vehicle will proceed fine in 2hi, 4hi is much easier on the road surface and trails. After grading, it takes longer for washboards to form. I wish more drives switched to 4x4 on gravel roads and trails, , the washboard would take longer to form after grading. Same on trails. Go 4x4 long before it's "needed". "Hug your local trail" I say. Ha.

I finally bought a good air compressor a couple years ago (ARB portable dual compressor with air tank) and started airing down more for low speed work. Before that, I'd only go down to 40lb or so as I wanted to safely make it from the trailhead to the nearest gas station to air back up. Once I bought the ARB, I air down at the drop of a hat. Even if the trail will only take about 30 minutes I air down since it's so fast and easy to air up. Was going to go with ARB single, but figured the portable we can use for multiple vehicles rather than mount to vehicle and fill times are so much faster with twin and air tank compared to single. Air tank also allows use of air tools, though I've not yet experimented with that. It was more about time spent airing up since time is money. Well, not money. But airing up in intense heat with no shade or in cold or rain, and reducing air-up time from 15 - 25 minutes to 5 or 6 minutes has value to me. I wanted it to be so fast that I didn't ever avoid airing down because airing up took so long.

On my previous pickup's 265/70R18, I'd could go from 32lb to 50lb in 30seconds per tire. And from 32lb to 65lb in about 45 seconds. I mention the size since that is only a medium sized tire and large volume tires, such as your 37", have significantly more internal volume to fill. With the air tank, I start the compressor and it immediately starts filling the air tank while I circle around to the first tire and remove cap. Tank builds enough pressure to give a big inrush of air right off the bat rather than only outputting what the compressor can output. Once one tire is aired, compressor would keep running to re-fill the air tank, rather than shutting off, as I moved to the next tire. So I really like having the air tank along with the twin compressors (twin compressors have 100% duty cycle; so no waiting to let it cool down X minutes after X minutes of use. Plus, they are twice as fast). Going to larger tires will take more time but the difference in fill time between a single compressor and twin compressor with tank is a big spread and even more meaningful the larger the tire volume. I've long since absorbed the price different between a single compressor and dual compressor, but every time I fill, I say out loud "boy I'm glad I bought the twin compressor".

For airing down, I use Coyote Enterprises deflators. They are similar to Staun deflators but US vs Australian and have some features that I like better than the Staun brand. And, they come with two sets of spring ranges vs buying two sets of deflators for different ranges. Set them to the air pressure you want, screw them on your tire valve and they start to deflate, but they stop at the tire pressure you pre-set at home. They are meant to be set to one pressure at home and stay at that setting; rather than adjusting them to different pressures. I set them to the highest pressure I typically use knowing that once they shut off, I can manually let out a bit more air speeds and terrain dictate it. Larger tires or lower pressure will take longer, but when I aired from 50lb to around 34lb, by the time I had screwed the deflators onto all four valve stems, the first one was nearly done (maybe 30 more seconds). There are other deflator systems that are even faster and remove the valve stems or add a second deflator stem, but I haven't found the need. Those are for guys with huge/fat tires that air down to 8lb regularly.

I set my deflators to around 32lb - 34lb as that is what I'd use (with camper on) for most trails, but if they were particularly rocky, I could just manually let out more. Maybe down to 28lb or so. One could air down more, but haven't found the need since the lower you go, the more ground clearance you lose. for us, 28 - 34lbs seem to cover most terrain and driving speeds with camper on (2,000+ pounds). Smooths out the trail for us, works the suspension less, less jarring on camper and equipment, but retains ground clearance and can still drive faster when trail/terrain allow.

Like everything, the above is just what works for me. And even that is always evolving. Blend that in with all the other opinions out their to formulate a starting point for you, but you'll then adjust from there and figure out what works for you for deflating, refilling, pressures, etc.
Experimentation is key to find the sweet spot for your rig weight, terrain, driving speeds, clearance and comfort level.
 
Last edited:
Here is our F250 Tremor with the 2022 OEV Camp-x. 400w of solar, Redarc manager 30, maxxair fans x2, Dometic RTX1000 12v A/C, 270 awning, shower cube, weboost, molle panels on the rear, truma water heater, truma heater, 20 gallons fresh water and Dometic 57 fridge/freezer. I'm enjoying our A/C! But mine is mounted in the rear of the camper, so the noise doesn't bother me at all. Im sure some of yall have seen my pics in another thread....but what the heck. My wife and I flew to Denver and looked at the 4WC, supertramp and OEV. 4WC is a well known and has a long history in the truck bed camper market. They make a great product, but I could tell right away that the quality wasn't on par with OEV and ST. I really liked the ST when we toured their shop, but we decided on the OEV and we are very happy with our choice!

Man this thread is a page turner for those of us planning to go the truck camper route. I've found more info and straight forward answers in this thread, than I've found browsing numerous forums and youtube videos, so thanks everyone for all of the posts. This thread is gold for straight answers and good info.

I saw you had the AC installed on your OEX, so same question as I asked above about the FWC. How's the AC perform and has it been worth it? Any issues with power or condensation as a result? Are you mostly running it at night, or at the height of day? We're based in North Carolina and for such a large investment would like to at least have the option to camp year round and be reasonably comfortable. We tent camp now and use fans so by no means are we being unrealistic. Just trying to determine if AC's as an option add on is in fact worth it.
 
Man this thread is a page turner for those of us planning to go the truck camper route. I've found more info and straight forward answers in this thread, than I've found browsing numerous forums and youtube videos, so thanks everyone for all of the posts. This thread is gold for straight answers and good info.

I saw you had the AC installed on your OEX, so same question as I asked above about the FWC. How's the AC perform and has it been worth it? Any issues with power or condensation as a result? Are you mostly running it at night, or at the height of day? We're based in North Carolina and for such a large investment would like to at least have the option to camp year round and be reasonably comfortable. We tent camp now and use fans so by no means are we being unrealistic. Just trying to determine if AC's as an option add on is in fact worth it.
So a couple things…..it’s cools, but not like a window unit at home. I have the smaller of the two, RTX1000. We mostly run it at night, and on Eco, it will last all night on 200ah. We can run it during the day, and with full sun, it’s net zero on power. But full sun in S Texas humidity is kind of a wash🥵. Also, it has made the roof significantly heavier, making it harder to open with one person. Without it, we simply wouldn’t be able to camp local in the summer. Overall, it was worth it for us. Lemme know if you have anymore questions.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_6500.jpeg
    IMG_6500.jpeg
    479 KB · Views: 27
I tend to not go as low on pressure as most. True offroaders wouldn't even consider my pressures as "aired down". Ha. But even airing down a bit makes a huge difference. On previous pickup, I was 50lb to 65lb for highway driving depending on payload (camper on or off). I usually only air down to 34lb to 28lb. It is speed and terrain dependent. "Real" offroads don't consider anything over 15lbs to be aired down. But I'm in a pickup with camper; not in a dedicated rock crawler. Though my wife might disagree considering some of the places we end up. She gets out and walks at that point. Not to spot; just because she prefers to be outside the cab rather than in it when wheels start coming off the ground.

First thing I did was reach out to an engineer at Cooper tire and get their load rating chart for my specific tire and various air pressures. I knew what my loaded (with camper) and unloaded axle weights were. Max load rating, of a specific tire, varies with air temperature and is not linier. So I knew at what tire pressure I should be for highway driving at any given weight and set my air pressure to at least that (though usually give myself 300 - 500lb of leeway which is 3 - 5 lbs more air pressure).

For washboard roads, it really depends on the roads. Sometimes I don't air down at all, or just a bit, because I'm driving them 60+mph to smooth them out and keep the shocks cool. Hole-In-The-Rock trail, near Escalante, UT is a good example. 30 miles stretch of washboard to get into the slot canyons. The road has very few turns and is mostly very wide and straight. Traffic moves at two speeds because of how washboard the road is; 5 - 10mph or 40 - 70mph. Other gravel roads are tight and winding so airing down makes sense. And, it is way easier on a road surface or trail to be in 4hi rather than 2hi. Soap box alert: I hear too may saying "made it X far before needing 4hi" or "my truck makes it up that fine in 2hi". It's not about need. Switching to 4hi early is far less wear and tear on roads and trails because it keeps traction compared to a single axle and two contact patches on the edge of grip or losing traction on washboard bumps, which makes the washboard worse each time that happens. Even though vehicle will proceed fine in 2hi, 4hi is much easier on the road surface and trails. After grading, it takes longer for washboards to form. I wish more drives switched to 4x4 on gravel roads and trails, , the washboard would take longer to form after grading. Same on trails. Go 4x4 long before it's "needed". "Hug your local trail" I say. Ha.

I finally bought a good air compressor a couple years ago (ARB portable dual compressor with air tank) and started airing down more for low speed work. Before that, I'd only go down to 40lb or so as I wanted to safely make it from the trailhead to the nearest gas station to air back up. Once I bought the ARB, I air down at the drop of a hat. Even if the trail will only take about 30 minutes I air down since it's so fast and easy to air up. Was going to go with ARB single, but figured the portable we can use for multiple vehicles rather than mount to vehicle and fill times are so much faster with twin and air tank compared to single. Air tank also allows use of air tools, though I've not yet experimented with that. It was more about time spent airing up since time is money. Well, not money. But airing up in intense heat with no shade or in cold or rain, and reducing air-up time from 15 - 25 minutes to 5 or 6 minutes has value to me. I wanted it to be so fast that I didn't ever avoid airing down because airing up took so long.

On my previous pickup's 265/70R18, I'd could go from 32lb to 50lb in 30seconds per tire. And from 32lb to 65lb in about 45 seconds. I mention the size since that is only a medium sized tire and large volume tires, such as your 37", have significantly more internal volume to fill. With the air tank, I start the compressor and it immediately starts filling the air tank while I circle around to the first tire and remove cap. Tank builds enough pressure to give a big inrush of air right off the bat rather than only outputting what the compressor can output. Once one tire is aired, compressor would keep running to re-fill the air tank, rather than shutting off, as I moved to the next tire. So I really like having the air tank along with the twin compressors (twin compressors have 100% duty cycle; so no waiting to let it cool down X minutes after X minutes of use. Plus, they are twice as fast). Going to larger tires will take more time but the difference in fill time between a single compressor and twin compressor with tank is a big spread and even more meaningful the larger the tire volume. I've long since absorbed the price different between a single compressor and dual compressor, but every time I fill, I say out loud "boy I'm glad I bought the twin compressor".

For airing down, I use Coyote Enterprises deflators. They are similar to Staun deflators but US vs Australian and have some features that I like better than the Staun brand. And, they come with two sets of spring ranges vs buying two sets of deflators for different ranges. Set them to the air pressure you want, screw them on your tire valve and they start to deflate, but they stop at the tire pressure you pre-set at home. They are meant to be set to one pressure at home and stay at that setting; rather than adjusting them to different pressures. I set them to the highest pressure I typically use knowing that once they shut off, I can manually let out a bit more air speeds and terrain dictate it. Larger tires or lower pressure will take longer, but when I aired from 50lb to around 34lb, by the time I had screwed the deflators onto all four valve stems, the first one was nearly done (maybe 30 more seconds). There are other deflator systems that are even faster and remove the valve stems or add a second deflator stem, but I haven't found the need. Those are for guys with huge/fat tires that air down to 8lb regularly.

I set my deflators to around 32lb - 34lb as that is what I'd use (with camper on) for most trails, but if they were particularly rocky, I could just manually let out more. Maybe down to 28lb or so. One could air down more, but haven't found the need since the lower you go, the more ground clearance you lose. for us, 28 - 34lbs seem to cover most terrain and driving speeds with camper on (2,000+ pounds). Smooths out the trail for us, works the suspension less, less jarring on camper and equipment, but retains ground clearance and can still drive faster when trail/terrain allow.

Like everything, the above is just what works for me. And even that is always evolving. Blend that in with all the other opinions out their to formulate a starting point for you, but you'll then adjust from there and figure out what works for you for deflating, refilling, pressures, etc.
Experimentation is key to find the sweet spot for your rig weight, terrain, driving speeds, clearance and comfort level.
Phenomenal response as always thank you!

Hahaha. So I KNOW hole in the rock road, we did it in 2018 with my Tacoma/ GFC combo and I opted for the 60 mph option…. And it still sucked!!!! In fact it broke all the eggs in my fridge and made a mess. That said we did two of those slot canyons!!! One up and one back and they were INCREDIBLE!!!!!

IMG_7687.jpeg


Re: compressors. I actually have a ARB twin and the Dirt Church behind the seat mounts sitting at home pending an install. I went with this combo because it takes up almost zero space, has an outlet in both sides of the truck (open either back door), and keeps the compressor in a dry, dust free and climate controlled area. I don’t need mobility as this will be my only adventure vehicle, at least that gets aired down.

I also bought deflators I went Staun preset at 35# thinking exactly like you did, I can always go a little lower if needed.

I was also thinking about getting one of those inflate/ deflate hoses that do two tires so I can air the back two up together and then the front two together to a slightly lower pressure.
 
Man this thread is a page turner for those of us planning to go the truck camper route. I've found more info and straight forward answers in this thread, than I've found browsing numerous forums and youtube videos, so thanks everyone for all of the posts. This thread is gold for straight answers and good info.

I saw you had the AC installed on your OEX, so same question as I asked above about the FWC. How's the AC perform and has it been worth it? Any issues with power or condensation as a result? Are you mostly running it at night, or at the height of day? We're based in North Carolina and for such a large investment would like to at least have the option to camp year round and be reasonably comfortable. We tent camp now and use fans so by no means are we being unrealistic. Just trying to determine if AC's as an option add on is in fact worth it.

So a couple things…..it’s cools, but not like a window unit at home. I have the smaller of the two, RTX1000. We mostly run it at night, and on Eco, it will last all night on 200ah. We can run it during the day, and with full sun, it’s net zero on power. But full sun in S Texas humidity is kind of a wash🥵. Also, it has made the roof significantly heavier, making it harder to open with one person. Without it, we simply wouldn’t be able to camp local in the summer. Overall, it was worth it for us. Lemme know if you have anymore questions.
I ordered mine with A/C and after endless back and forth it came down to, I’d rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it. I hadn’t considered the weight in regards to opening the roof manually but I can see that as a major consideration if you’re doing it every night.

The portable units might be a great option in something like an OEV camper. That way you don’t carry it around when you don’t need it.

The Wave2 cools with a little over 5000 BTU’s which is actually a little more than the RTX1000. And it’s a heat pump so it’ll heat when you need it too.

The other option is a small DC mini split. Not sure of the model they use but the AT Aterra uses one of those with pretty good success.
 
Last edited:
So a couple things…..it’s cools, but not like a window unit at home. I have the smaller of the two, RTX1000. We mostly run it at night, and on Eco, it will last all night on 200ah. We can run it during the day, and with full sun, it’s net zero on power. But full sun in S Texas humidity is kind of a wash🥵. Also, it has made the roof significantly heavier, making it harder to open with one person. Without it, we simply wouldn’t be able to camp local in the summer. Overall, it was worth it for us. Lemme know if you have anymore questions.
That’s awesome you can run the AC during the day and your solar can keep up! That definitely makes it worth while having it installed like you do. How much solar does that OEV have on it?
 
I ordered mine with A/C and after endless back and forth it came down to, I’d rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it. I hadn’t considered the weight in regards to opening the roof manually but I can see that as a major consideration if you’re doing it every night.

The portable units might be a great option in something like an OEV camper. That way you don’t carry it around when you don’t need it.

The Wave2 cools with a little over 5000 BTU’s which is actually a little more than the RTX1000. And it’s a heat pump so it’ll heat when you need it too.

The other option is a small DC mini split. Not sure of the model they use but the AT Aterra uses one of those with pretty good success.

We are still leaning towards no built in A/C on our Supertramp. I was going to order the Wave 2, but ended up doing the new Zero Breeze mark 3 pre-order. The no-battery option is $799 presale price. Since no-battery, we'll run the A/C off AC (either camper inverter or bring our "solar generator"). But, unlike the Wave 2 that only allows proprietary DC power, the Zero Breeze 3 will run off any 48v DC supply. Be that off a battery, a 48v solar generator or power pack outlet, or DC/DC converter. Any of those will be more efficient than using a 12v DC to 120v AC inverter, running the A/C off AC, which internally converts 120v to 48v DC. But, just to give an idea, the Zero Breeze mark 3 will use the following. My guess is the Wave2 is about the same.
High: 350 - 500 watts (max cooling is 5,280 BTU)
Medium: 200- 350watts
Sleep: 150 - 200 watts
Dehumidify: 350 - 500watts
Heat: 200 - 500watts
Weight: 19.8 lbs without battery

We typically don't need A/C where we frequent and it will likely be 10+ years before we have the time to travel so much that we end up in hot climates when it's too hot for just vents. In 10 years, who knows what tech will be out there for DC A/C add ons or campers, etc. And so we are going the portable route so will only bring it with then we might need it, which is a fraction of the time. Then no 75lb on top of the roof full time. Not a 'heavy lift' impact for the Supertramp since we'll have electric actuators doing the work, but I can't image another 75lb on the roof of our OEV CAMP-X or our FWC Hawk with manual lift (Though one can replace the gas struts with more powerful units to help with that).

I do like the idea of a minisplit like AT uses or that others have custom fit to their rigs. Only issue is most seem to put the exterior heat exchanger hanging off the rear and that is where it will get caked with dust. It doesn't take much dust to really reduce the effectiveness of a heat exchanger. Up on the roof my be a hotter place for it, but at least it won't be in the vortex behind the truck that sucks up a constant dust cloud.
 
Last edited:
Phenomenal response as always thank you!

Hahaha. So I KNOW hole in the rock road, we did it in 2018 with my Tacoma/ GFC combo and I opted for the 60 mph option…. And it still sucked!!!! In fact it broke all the eggs in my fridge and made a mess. That said we did two of those slot canyons!!! One up and one back and they were INCREDIBLE!!!!!

Re: compressors. I actually have a ARB twin and the Dirt Church behind the seat mounts sitting at home pending an install. I went with this combo because it takes up almost zero space, has an outlet in both sides of the truck (open either back door), and keeps the compressor in a dry, dust free and climate controlled area. I don’t need mobility as this will be my only adventure vehicle, at least that gets aired down.

I also bought deflators I went Staun preset at 35# thinking exactly like you did, I can always go a little lower if needed.

I was also thinking about getting one of those inflate/ deflate hoses that do two tires so I can air the back two up together and then the front two together to a slightly lower pressure.

Yeah, on the way in on Hole in the Rock, I stopped once, at Devils Garden, to feel my shocks to see if they were heating up. Cool as can be. Knowing that for the way out later that day, we did the 35mile drive out in under 30 minutes. But if anyone asks, I'll deny it. Ha. Peek-a-boo and Spooky slots were worth the drive.

I have seen the inflator hoses that attach multiple tires together. My take on it is they won't save any time, but they will ensure identical tire pressure and if one has a setup that you'd need to otherwise bend over to use, there could be a benefit there. But, the air compressor will run the exact same amount of time to inflate the tires. I have the ARB inflator and so as soon as you let off, it instantly tells you the pressure. The hose is long enough to stand up while inflating, so not like I'm crouched down by the tire to inflate. Just standing tall next to it, squeezing the handle. And on previous rig's tires, like mentioned, I knew that it would take x number of seconds to get up to a certain pressure. So I'd start airing and just count in my head to 30 or 45 (depending on how much I was aired down or how much I wanted to air up) and would usually be within a few pounds the very first time I stopped pumping and checked pressure. Then just one or two more squeezes to dial in the exact pressure.
Having more 'stuff' is fun and interesting as I do like to tinker with such things, but in the end, I decided to keep deflation/inflation as simple as possible with less kit to store and setup. And, since I'm only spending 30 to 45 seconds on each tire, no value in setting up hoses to join them.

Now, can we talk about high-flow CO2 inflation tanks and setups? Wait, no. I just said I don't need more stuff. Ha.
 
Yeah, on the way in on Hole in the Rock, I stopped once, at Devils Garden, to feel my shocks to see if they were heating up. Cool as can be. Knowing that for the way out later that day, we did the 35mile drive out in under 30 minutes. But if anyone asks, I'll deny it. Ha. Peek-a-boo and Spooky slots were worth the drive.

I have seen the inflator hoses that attach multiple tires together. My take on it is they won't save any time, but they will ensure identical tire pressure and if one has a setup that you'd need to otherwise bend over to use, there could be a benefit there. But, the air compressor will run the exact same amount of time to inflate the tires. I have the ARB inflator and so as soon as you let off, it instantly tells you the pressure. The hose is long enough to stand up while inflating, so not like I'm crouched down by the tire to inflate. Just standing tall next to it, squeezing the handle. And on previous rig's tires, like mentioned, I knew that it would take x number of seconds to get up to a certain pressure. So I'd start airing and just count in my head to 30 or 45 (depending on how much I was aired down or how much I wanted to air up) and would usually be within a few pounds the very first time I stopped pumping and checked pressure. Then just one or two more squeezes to dial in the exact pressure.
Having more 'stuff' is fun and interesting as I do like to tinker with such things, but in the end, I decided to keep deflation/inflation as simple as possible with less kit to store and setup. And, since I'm only spending 30 to 45 seconds on each tire, no value in setting up hoses to join them.

Now, can we talk about high-flow CO2 inflation tanks and setups? Wait, no. I just said I don't need more stuff. Ha.
Hahaha yes!! Power tanks are awesome! And talk about being able to run air tools! 😉

We did Peek A Boo and Spooky, incredible! Talk about a hidden gem. I would tell anyone who reads this and wants to try it to go in prepared. You’re really on your own back there and help isn’t close by.

You mention not needing AC where you are, MT I think, but if I recall the absolute hottest night we ever had in a camper was up near Whitefish…. Maybe 2020??? It was so hot they had closed all the streams in the area to fishing and it was well in excess of 100 degrees durning the day and damn close to that at night. We were in the AluCab Khaya at the time and went to the nearest Walmart and bought USB powered desk fans and some clips to hang them by the bed blowing on us. It worked, but I would have ponied up $5k that night to be comfortable. Like I said you never know, that portable AC option sounds idea if it can be carried someplace secure and out of the way.
 
Last edited:
Back
Top