Snow driving rear axle weight

Guyute941

Tremor Fanatic
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Mar 7, 2021
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Location
Oregon
Current Ride
2021 F-250 6.7
I used to put 6 tubes of sand in my F-150 which was about 300-350 LBS over the rear axle. Do you think that will make a dent on the F-250 Tremor Axle? I can’t go much more that that due to not wanting to take up the that much more space in the bed.

I live in roundabout central (tons in our city) with winter driving conditions from anytime now until April. I’ve broke the rear loose on just wet pavement (sometimes on purpose) on the roundabouts when the turbo kicks in.

Want a more planted rear.

Tire pressure is 50 front 48 rear.
 
It may or may not be an economic solution for you. But I use 4x6 horse stall mats. They are about #60s each. I have 5 stacked in my bed now with two #50 tube sand bags. Just drove up my road that currently has 5in of snow on it. Non issue with traction. 50psi on the rear tires.
 
It may or may not be an economic solution for you. But I use 4x6 horse stall mats. They are about #60s each. I have 5 stacked in my bed now with two #50 tube sand bags. Just drove up my road that currently has 5in of snow on it. Non issue with traction. 50psi on the rear tires.

Interesting solution, have no idea what these horse mats are, but will look into them

Been thinking about this problem since I’m going from a F150 with the 4A to the traditional 4 wheel drive system
 
Interesting solution, have no idea what these horse mats are, but will look into them

Been thinking about this problem since I’m going from a F150 with the 4A to the traditional 4 wheel drive system
Tractor supply sells them. Used to be around $45 each. Not sure now. They have 2 different thicknesses. I have the 3/4 inch thick mats that weigh 100+ pounds each. They’re black so they blend in well in the bed and you lose a little depth in your bed. Great option.
 
I put about 1500# of sand bags in the back of my truck. It sits level and rides way better than empty. Since I started doing this last year, it is UNSTOPPABLE in the snow. Before with no weight in the back it was just okay. This includes having studded snow tires on. These are big, heavy trucks that are really front heavy. Weight in the back is extremely helpful.
 
Sandbags are less than $1 each and sand is free if you live in the right spot. Just sayin.

sandbags for cheap
Even buying from the Depot it is ~$.07 per lb in the 50lb bags... I usually do this and then use it for outdoor projects when the weather turns nice again.

(No free sand by me...)
 
Tractor supply sells them. Used to be around $45 each. Not sure now. They have 2 different thicknesses. I have the 3/4 inch thick mats that weigh 100+ pounds each. They’re black so they blend in well in the bed and you lose a little depth in your bed. Great option.

I’m putting in a bed rug and having a fridge mounted on a slide so it sounds like they won’t fit
 
Was thinking about framing out a pallet so I could fill it with about 4-5 inches of concrete. This way I could use the forks on my tractor to easily put it in the truck for extra weight. Just need to figure out a way to anchor it so that I don't have a 900 lb slab sliding around.
 
Was thinking about framing out a pallet so I could fill it with about 4-5 inches of concrete. This way I could use the forks on my tractor to easily put it in the truck for extra weight. Just need to figure out a way to anchor it so that I don't have a 900 lb slab sliding around.
Just build a mold that thickness that’s the dimensions between the wheel wells and length of the box and it won’t move and shim it in with some wedges if you need. You could get fancy even and throw some rebar in it to give it some extra durability when forking in and out to help with the flex. Just don’t let salt get on it til it’s cured for about 2 years or else it’ll start to fall apart very prematurely (like in 3-5 years instead of 30-50 years). Or make it “T” shaped. You could get real fancy with it and have a cutout for your gooseneck if you have a need for it. Post pics if you make a concrete weight.
 
Also. I might see about acquiring some old tractor weights this week from some farming and ranching contacts. Will report back on this.
 
Tractor supply sells them. Used to be around $45 each. Not sure now. They have 2 different thicknesses. I have the 3/4 inch thick mats that weigh 100+ pounds each. They’re black so they blend in well in the bed and you lose a little depth in your bed. Great option.
That seems pricey for just bed weight....yikes
 
That seems pricey for just bed weight....yikes
You can also think of as added protection for your bed If ever load pallets into the back…or gravel/rocks/logs. These mats are nearly indestructible. I happen to have a pallets of them left over, so no big out of pocket expense at the moment.
 
I don't put any weight in the bed, do a lot of snow driving and never needed it. I've gone over 4 foot piles and across tons of snow without trouble. never needed it on my tundra either all that matters is the right tires. The stock tires work well and i will be going back to my tried and true open country after they wear out.
 
I don't put any weight in the bed, do a lot of snow driving and never needed it. I've gone over 4 foot piles and across tons of snow without trouble. never needed it on my tundra either all that matters is the right tires. The stock tires work well and i will be going back to my tried and true open country after they wear out.

Tires aren't "all that matters." Even with studded snow tires, the weight in the back makes a HUGE difference. You don't need weight in the bed to drive in the snow, but it will get around soooooo much better with it. I've done the tests with and without enough times. Sometimes an early fall snow or later spring snow will catch me with my truck not in prime winter setup and I've seen the difference.

With the weight in the back of my truck, I can do stupid stuff like stop in the middle of a steep hill and get going again. Without it, I'd just spin, then have to back down and use momentum to drive up. My house is on a very steep hill and in Lake Tahoe we get a ton of snow every year. I'm also able to stop much more confidently and the back end is less likely to kick out.
 
Tires aren't "all that matters." Even with studded snow tires, the weight in the back makes a HUGE difference. You don't need weight in the bed to drive in the snow, but it will get around soooooo much better with it. I've done the tests with and without enough times. Sometimes an early fall snow or later spring snow will catch me with my truck not in prime winter setup and I've seen the difference.

With the weight in the back of my truck, I can do stupid stuff like stop in the middle of a steep hill and get going again. Without it, I'd just spin, then have to back down and use momentum to drive up. My house is on a very steep hill and in Lake Tahoe we get a ton of snow every year. I'm also able to stop much more confidently and the back end is less likely to kick out.

How much weight is needed to see a improvement?
 
How much weight is needed to see a improvement?
I think the challenge lies in balancing the performance/constant load hauling effect with added traction for your own needs but I’d wager 400-800 pounds perhaps? I don’t think it’s exclusively a more is more situation though.
 
I think the challenge lies in balancing the performance/constant load hauling effect with added traction for your own needs but I’d wager 400-800 pounds perhaps? I don’t think it’s exclusively a more is more situation though.

Good starting point for us snow novices
 
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