SHTF anyone?

EKUgrad

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In a SHTF scenario who gives af about some legal amount of gas?

Definitely diesel is better for this, though. There are multiple reasons for my multiple farm fuel tanks.
 
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OldCowboy

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Is this a real thing or a gag? You cant install a device like this to protect from EMP. That isn't how it works. EMP energizes individual circuits/devices and roasts them.
It's not a gag. They really work. The company as well as the military have tested it. The military contracted with them for a bunch of units to protect the new Humvee's. There are YouTube videos you can watch. It's a real company and they have real data. Not that I know it's not faked, but they seem to have a good reputation.
 

HitIt

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It's not a gag. They really work. The company as well as the military have tested it. The military contracted with them for a bunch of units to protect the new Humvee's. There are YouTube videos you can watch. It's a real company and they have real data. Not that I know it's not faked, but they seem to have a good reputation.
They have tested to "military standards". That doesn't mean that a device will work in any given environment/installation. You are counting on this thing, which is connected to upstream devices through huge lengths of 22 AWG wires and numerous connectors with their associated resistance and inductance, to protect against the upstream components that are well isolated from this device at high frequency (which EMPs operate at).

Will you please provide a link that shows the military has bought these things for humvees? Will you please provide a link to the testing that the military performed?

Also, the super small gauge wires that come out of the box are hilarious. EMP/lightning/etc. induce huge currents. Its like they aren't even trying to put on a good show.

Extreme buyer beware with this.
 
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OldCowboy

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They have tested to "military standards". That doesn't mean that a device will work in any given environment/installation. You are counting on this thing, which is connected to upstream devices through huge lengths of 22 AWG wires and numerous connectors with their associated resistance and inductance, to protect against the upstream components that are well isolated from this device at high frequency (which EMPs operate at).

Will you please provide a link that shows the military has bought these things for humvees? Will you please provide a link to the testing that the military performed?

Also, the super small gauge wires that come out of the box are hilarious. EMP/lightning/etc. induce huge currents. Its like they aren't even trying to put on a good show.

Extreme buyer beware with this.
It's late and I'm headed to bed but here is a start.
 

BlueKilla

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It's late and I'm headed to bed but here is a start.

This reminds me of the hoax circulating the web years ago where people where ionizing water under the hood to boost mpg. Square D actually makes a surge protector for your home that insures up to $50k in the event of a power surge that I'd trust more than this company's product and $25k warranty. They're banking on selling these things knowing they will never be tested in a real life emp strike scenario imo.

Screenshot_20211025-080006.png
 
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OldCowboy

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This reminds me of the hoax circulating the web years ago where people where ionizing water under the hood to boost mpg. Square D actually makes a surge protector for your home that insures up to $50k in the event of a power surge that I'd trust more than this company's product and $25k warranty. They're banking on selling these things knowing they will never be tested in a real life emp strike scenario imo.
You could be right. We're not going to know until an EMP strikes (if it ever does). If you're right I'm out some cash. If I'm right I drive home and you walk.
 

PapaRaptor

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This reminds me of the hoax circulating the web years ago where people where ionizing water under the hood to boost mpg. Square D actually makes a surge protector for your home that insures up to $50k in the event of a power surge that I'd trust more than this company's product and $25k warranty. They're banking on selling these things knowing they will never be tested in a real life emp strike scenario imo.

View attachment 37553
I agree total scam. I have way too many friends in the Military that have been around the EMP technology since late 1980s. I was first informed about them in 1987. When my buddy was playing with some military toys on his base in Jacksonville.
 
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OldCowboy

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I agree total scam. I have way too many friends in the Military that have been around the EMP technology since late 1980s. I was first informed about them in 1987. When my buddy was playing with some military toys on his base in Jacksonville.
Perhaps, but if so they had to fool a legitimate testing facility that gets paid to do EMI testing. Before you pass judgement you may want to have a look at the testing data. I did when I was researching the product because I didn't believe it either. Keystone is a legit testing facility in PA. I know because I talked to one of their testing engineers. They have been in business since 2007. They did test the EMP Shield and they certified it as in compliance with MIL-STD-188-125-1, MIL-STD-461G & MIL-STD-464C.

You can believe you are right and call it a fraud, or you can do a little reading. I'll make the research shorter for you than it was me and send you the link where you can find the data.

 

Dissident

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Perhaps, but if so they had to fool a legitimate testing facility that gets paid to do EMI testing. Before you pass judgement you may want to have a look at the testing data. I did when I was researching the product because I didn't believe it either. Keystone is a legit testing facility in PA. I know because I talked to one of their testing engineers. They have been in business since 2007. They did test the EMP Shield and they certified it as in compliance with MIL-STD-188-125-1, MIL-STD-461G & MIL-STD-464C.

You can believe you are right and call it a fraud, or you can do a little reading. I'll make the research shorter for you than it was me and send you the link where you can find the data.



The device only works if everything down stream is hardened. Its effectively a gate for Antennas and external sensors. The hoax is that your truck isn't fenced in so its like having a gate on your driveway with an unfenced yard. An EMP will be able to energize individual boards and cook them.
 
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OldCowboy

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The device only works if everything down stream is hardened. Its effectively a gate for Antennas and external sensors. The hoax is that your truck isn't fenced in so its like having a gate on your driveway with an unfenced yard. An EMP will be able to energize individual boards and cook them.
Makes sense, but if so, why do they advertise that this is going to stop it? Betting on never having to pay up? They already have had their products tested by mother nature by way of lightning strikes. They report that they had 15 homes with their products hit by lightning last year with no damage except a burned out EMP shield. Lightening can't get past the gate.
 

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Makes sense, but if so, why do they advertise that this is going to stop it? Betting on never having to pay up? They already have had their products tested by mother nature by way of lightning strikes. They report that they had 15 homes with their products hit by lightning last year with no damage except a burned out EMP shield. Lightening can't get past the gate.

Because if there is an EMP how are you going to contact them? Are you going to travel through chaos to knock on their front door and have them pay with what? A stash of gold bars that they keep in case there is no financial system no courts proceedings jsut becasue they said it would work?

The lighting tried to go through the gate and it got blocked makes sense lightning is directional and follows a path. An EMP is an energy wave its going to go around the gate and energize everything.
 

Dissident

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The biggest distinction is that getting hit with an EMP is different than getting hit with effects of a system that got hit with an EMP. The EMP shield is a glorified surge protector.
 

Vecman

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For me, I don’t care. It was like $350 for the device. It took less than 10 min to install it. I like the research they’ve done. If it works, great. If it doesn’t, oh well. For me, $350 wasn’t a risk so I just don’t care. This isn’t my end all move for vehicle protection, but an inexpensive thing to at least “try”. I’m trying to do more faraday type stuff for a garage size structure so I can keep more things protected beyond vehicles. I’m not going try to convert anyone to this device, or any other device. Just thought it was worth the risk to have it, but I’m not going to rely solely on it
 
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OldCowboy

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Because if there is an EMP how are you going to contact them? Are you going to travel through chaos to knock on their front door and have them pay with what? A stash of gold bars that they keep in case there is no financial system no courts proceedings jsut becasue they said it would work?

The lighting tried to go through the gate and it got blocked makes sense lightning is directional and follows a path. An EMP is an energy wave its going to go around the gate and energize everything.

The biggest distinction is that getting hit with an EMP is different than getting hit with effects of a system that got hit with an EMP. The EMP shield is a glorified surge protector.
I do understand the risk that if there comes a time when I need the product, if it does not work, I will have no recourse. I've researched it for about a year. I've decided that it is worth the risk. I've seen them tested and, while everything can be faked, this seems to have enough testing behind it to be real.

Lightning does follow a path, but while an EMP is a wave, it still follows a path. actually 3 paths. let's say they detonate a nuclear bomb 300 miles up in the atmosphere (we can equally talk about a coronal mass ejection but the bomb is more prepper exciting). The first path is called an E1. It is the wave directly from the blast. The next is called E2 and it comes from the blast wave that goes up instead of down. It bounces off the ionosphere and gets reflected back to earth. Then there is an E3 that is the bounce back that happens in the atmosphere. All happen within the first second.

When that pulse meets your car, the wires act like antennas to carry the pulse to your sensitive circuits. Think of the system as a boat taking on water (my analogy not theirs). If all you have is a measuring cup and your hands. You can't bail out the water fast enough and the boat sinks. If you have the same measuring cup but some machine that will dip and pour out the water super fast, it will pour out the water in very small amounts but very quickly before it builds up real volume and you can drain the boat. This EMP shield shunts the current to ground so fast that it doesn't build up enough current to do any damage. They say it's all about speed and their gizmo operates 1000 times faster than the EMP.

Now I don't know if it does or doesn't, but Keystone does and they certified it. Do you have a problem with a company that does EMI testing saying it's good? They hit a circuit with a pulse, (actually 40 pulses) large enough to fry it and the magic box stopped all of them. Yes it's a glorified surge protector. That is what you want in your truck. An EMP is just a surge of current traveling in the atmosphere. It gets picked up by the antennas (wires) and fries your circuits. Drain the current and you kill the EMP.

And for the guy who said these gizmos have flimsy 22 gage wires, these wires are more like 14 gage solid copper not braided.
 

Dissident

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I do understand the risk that if there comes a time when I need the product, if it does not work, I will have no recourse. I've researched it for about a year. I've decided that it is worth the risk. I've seen them tested and, while everything can be faked, this seems to have enough testing behind it to be real.

Lightning does follow a path, but while an EMP is a wave, it still follows a path. actually 3 paths. let's say they detonate a nuclear bomb 300 miles up in the atmosphere (we can equally talk about a coronal mass ejection but the bomb is more prepper exciting). The first path is called an E1. It is the wave directly from the blast. The next is called E2 and it comes from the blast wave that goes up instead of down. It bounces off the ionosphere and gets reflected back to earth. Then there is an E3 that is the bounce back that happens in the atmosphere. All happen within the first second.

When that pulse meets your car, the wires act like antennas to carry the pulse to your sensitive circuits. Think of the system as a boat taking on water (my analogy not theirs). If all you have is a measuring cup and your hands. You can't bail out the water fast enough and the boat sinks. If you have the same measuring cup but some machine that will dip and pour out the water super fast, it will pour out the water in very small amounts but very quickly before it builds up real volume and you can drain the boat. This EMP shield shunts the current to ground so fast that it doesn't build up enough current to do any damage. They say it's all about speed and their gizmo operates 1000 times faster than the EMP.

Now I don't know if it does or doesn't, but Keystone does and they certified it. Do you have a problem with a company that does EMI testing saying it's good? They hit a circuit with a pulse, (actually 40 pulses) large enough to fry it and the magic box stopped all of them. Yes it's a glorified surge protector. That is what you want in your truck. An EMP is just a surge of current traveling in the atmosphere. It gets picked up by the antennas (wires) and fries your circuits. Drain the current and you kill the EMP.

And for the guy who said these gizmos have flimsy 22 gage wires, these wires are more like 14 gage solid copper not braided.

The problem with the testing is that the circuit needs to be open to the protection in order for it to work. I don't believe that the trucks ECU and all of its critical components are RF shielded to a degree that makes this component the difference maker. If a wave of energy hits the ECU board is the line to neutral or ground big enough out transfer it to the device or ground? Will the board components even survive the initial energization capacitors are big but board contacts have gotten smaller and smaller?

He actually states this in a video around 9 minutes. He explains that some things are RF shielded and don't need added protection while things unshielded will need protection. Circuits without RF protection are just going to be "poofed" but you can save RF shielded devices by not blowing them up from your 120V AC line.


also from another "preper website"

HEMP is not actually a thing preppers should worry about. Or, to be more precise, a HEMP attack on the continental US is a nuclear attack, so if it happens then it’ll be in the context of a full-scale nuclear war. In such a scenario, you’ve got far more immediate problems than a dead starter.

Solar EMPs are much more likely than any kind of man-made EMP, but a solar storm can’t generate the kinds of high-frequency EMP needed to knock out small electronics like those found in cars. So the more plausible solar EMP scenario is not a direct threat to your ride. (It is, however, an indirect threat via its impact on the country’s energy infrastructure, but more on that, below.)

All of society’s detailed knowledge about which cars will likely survive a nuclear-generated, high-altitude EMP (HEMP) and which won’t, is classified by various governments. But we do know enough to give some general guidelines:

  • The newer the car, the more vulnerable it is to HEMP.
  • Pre-1970’s cars are best, but are probably still vulnerable, depending on various factors.
  • Any car of any make/model/year needs its critical electrical parts to be protected by a metal Faraday cage for best results.
The fact that cars are made of metal does give them some limited shielding from EMP. But this spotty shielding just reduces the odds of damage by an unknown (and unknowable) degree that’s dependent on a ton of variables related to the blast and the vehicle.

Here’s a brief, incomplete list of the factors that will determine how your car responds to a HEMP:

  • The size and elevation of the nuclear blast
  • Geographic and seasonal variations in the earth’s magnetic field at both the location of the blast and the location of the vehicle
  • The location and physical orientation of the vehicle with respect to the blast
  • The amount and position of the metal parts of the car
  • The number, locations, and designs of the critical electronic systems inside the car
  • The length of the wires and cables attached to the vehicle’s electronics
 
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OldCowboy

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The problem with the testing is that the circuit needs to be open to the protection in order for it to work. I don't believe that the trucks ECU and all of its critical components are RF shielded to a degree that makes this component the difference maker. If a wave of energy hits the ECU board is the line to neutral or ground big enough out transfer it to the device or ground? Will the board components even survive the initial energization capacitors are big but board contacts have gotten smaller and smaller?

He actually states this in a video around 9 minutes. He explains that some things are RF shielded and don't need added protection while things unshielded will need protection. Circuits without RF protection are just going to be "poofed" but you can save RF shielded devices by not blowing them up from your 120V AC line.

also from another "preper website"
Now this is a conversation worth having. I can see the argument that a nuclear detonation would mean nuclear war and so the EMP is only a small part of the trouble about to be unleashed, but I also see a scenario where they don't want all out war, but want to strategically take out the grid. That would be the single warhead 300 miles up. How our feckless government responds will be a political issue and right now I don't see them having the backbone to respond with more than words.

As for the unshielded circuits, that is precisely what this unit is intended to protect. And yes, it can respond fast enough to shunt the current to ground. At least that is what they say. So they won't be "just poofed" because they won't see the dramatic rise in current.
 

HitIt

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And for the guy who said these gizmos have flimsy 22 gage wires, these wires are more like 14 gage solid copper not braided.
I said:
1) Your truck has long 22awg wires connecting a bunch of things. These wires have high resistance/inductance and will create high local voltages that will fry stuff (in addition to acting as antennas for any sort of EMP).
2) The tiny wires connecting the box to the vehicle are ridiculous. If you think that 14 awg is large for this application, I dont really know what to say. If it really is solid copper and not stranded, that says a lot about the engineering that went into the product.

What you said was that the military has purchased these for humvees and that the military tested them. I am still interested in some sort of evidence for that.

Regarding all of the testing, I think what you are missing is that they performing testing at the terminals of the device. They have no idea what the device will be connected to and are not certifying it to protect anything.

I really don't know what to tell you other than this device is a total scam.
 

HitIt

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I like the research they’ve done.
The main research they have done is market research to figure out where to market this and which buzzwords to use. The circuit inside would take anyone that knows what they are doing under a day to design including spec'ing parts. I guarantee that if you open it up it is just a combination of GDTs, MOVs, and TVS diodes. If you open up a common surge suppressing power strip, you will see the same stuff.
 
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