Scared Sh!tless

Agree trailer level - but would suggest 20%-25% pin weight for a 5th wheel or goose neck - which is what the OP posted about. As you noted 12% - 15% would be good for a bumper pull trailer.
OP said he has a WeighSafe Weight Distribution hitch. I am assuming that is a conventional (bumper pull) hitch.
 
Mis spoke on the built in but the trailer needs to be a bit lower in the front front tounge weight to alleviate wandering. High in front will definitely cause excessive wandering. This is worse with single axle trailers.
This is a new one on me. I have not heard of anyone suggest that level is not optimum for a trailer. Lowering the tongue will move the center of mass slightly forward, but not significantly I don't think. I am thinking that it would be better to move the load a little forward and keep the trailer level. I will have to think about this one some more.
 
I have not heard of anyone suggest that level is not optimum for a trailer.
I'm with you @shermanator2 . It's about tongue weight. I agree that without changing anything else, lowering the front will slightly increase tongue, but like you said, not significantly. Of course, you can only get as level as your hitch will allow and without having a custom hitch insert made you're probably limited to 1" increments. My method is to pick the closest increment to level, though, not intentionally put it lower than that. You really want the contact patch/load to be equivalent at all trailer wheels (2, 4, etc). On a tandem axle trailer this means you will have both axles loaded equally. If the tongue difference is significant then that means you will be unloading the rear axle significantly as well. I don't think either occurs within the range we are talking about. So in my head I'm back to "level" makes sense with the correct amount of tongue.
 
The angle of the trailer makes zero difference on the tongue weight. It is solely based on the weight distribution of the trailer.

The hitch height definitely affects how the weight is distributed between tandem axles, so close to level is best.

 
I'm with you @shermanator2 . It's about tongue weight. I agree that without changing anything else, lowering the front will slightly increase tongue, but like you said, not significantly. Of course, you can only get as level as your hitch will allow and without having a custom hitch insert made you're probably limited to 1" increments. My method is to pick the closest increment to level, though, not intentionally put it lower than that. You really want the contact patch/load to be equivalent at all trailer wheels (2, 4, etc). On a tandem axle trailer this means you will have both axles loaded equally. If the tongue difference is significant then that means you will be unloading the rear axle significantly as well. I don't think either occurs within the range we are talking about. So in my head I'm back to "level" makes sense with the correct amount of tongue.
Great discussion getting into the the nitty gritty here. Too bad the OP seems to have dropped out. I agree with everything you say but would like to elaborate a little on the multi-axle trailer case. There are two different suspension systems used on multi-axle trailers. Torsion(Torflex®) and leaf spring.
Leaf springs are normally set up with equalizers between the springs. In this case over a limited travel range the load on axles is equalized. This is true until equalizer rocker contacts the trailer frame. This means that over a reasonable range of fore and aft tilt, the contact patches will be equally loaded. Any tilt that there is will reduce the travel available for going over uneven surfaces. This seams like a good reason to aim for level, but it does not have to be perfect.
Torsion springs are a different animal. The axles are independent of each other with no load equalization. The tongue height will greatly effect the axle loading and is much more critical. Lowering the tongue transfers weight to the front axle and raising it transfers weight to the rear axle. This makes it also more critical that the tongue weight is measured at same attitude that the trailer is towed at.
With leaf springs or with a single axle trailer, lowering the tongue will slightly increase tongue weight due to the CG moving forward. With torsion springs, lowering the tongue will significantly reduce the tongue weight.
 
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There is no such thing as caster in a non steering axle like a trailer axle. Caster is the inclination of the steering axis, and since there is no steering axis, the concept does not exist. There is come positive camber when unloaded built into solid trailer axles so that when fully loaded they bend to near zero camber. I don't think that this has much to do with sway.

A agree with you that tongue weight is the most important factor. Unfortunately the OP has not told us what his tongue weight actually is. I do not agree that one should adjust the tongue weight to rake the trailer lower in front. One should adjust the tongue weight to be 12 to 15% of the trailer weight then adjust the drop or rise of the hitch to make the trailer approximately level.
I completely agree with checking the tongue weight vs rake. My initial bucking load squatted the truck and trailer pretty good just not enough for the total weight of everything. Once properly balanced the squat changed a little but not huge amount, load was rather heavy to begin with.
 
The angle of the trailer makes zero difference on the tongue weight. It is solely based on the weight distribution of the trailer.

The hitch height definitely affects how the weight is distributed between tandem axles, so close to level is best.

That is not the right case for a trailer. A trailer does not have its mass suspended from the frame. The center of mass is fixed to the trailer and significantly above the trailer axle. Tilting the trailer (single axle) forward moves the center of mass forward, slightly increasing the tongue weight.
 
That is not the right case for a trailer. A trailer does not have its mass suspended from the frame. The center of mass is fixed to the trailer and significantly above the trailer axle. Tilting the trailer (single axle) forward moves the center of mass forward, slightly increasing the tongue weight.
Alright I’ll agree but for different reasons. As the lever rotates around the fulcrum, the direction of the forces are no longer perpendicular to the lever. If the trailer were standing vertically on the tongue, the tongue weight would be 100%. However, while it isn’t zero, it’s still negligible for a “reasonably level” trailer.
 
Here's a good video on the effects of trailer tilt on tongue weight:


Short answer, forward tilt increases tongue weight with single axles, but reduces it with tandem axles. Opposite for rearward tilt.
 
Short answer, forward tilt increases tongue weight with single axles, but reduces it with tandem axles. Opposite for rearward tilt.
Good video and makes sense since the change in hitch height moves the fulcrum forward/backward between tandem axles. But keep in mind he showed +/- 3" in hitch height only changed tongue weight +/- 5%, and his test is using much shorter trailers where the effects will be more pronounced. If the goal is 12% tongue weight, that means approximately between 11.5% and 12.5% across a big range of hitch heights, which is still totally fine. Your tongue weight will vary far more than 5% based on how it's loaded, especially including tank levels.
 
Agree with all regarding tong weight. Would also be helpful noting what the weight of the toys in the back are. Does it sway unloaded? We tow with only about 9k and never had an issue, Even at high passing speeds. Only, issue I have had is when the idiot at the gravel yard loaded my dump trailer in the middle to rear. Almost had to change shorts at 45mp. Half an hour later on the side of the road shoveling 3/4 minus to the front and problem solved. Never had to use a WD hitch with the Tremor. +1 for scale reading loaded.
 
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