Payload sticker pondering

Guyute941

Tremor Fanatic
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2021 F-250 6.7
Minus the legality of payload sticker and hauling and insurance with regard to accidents etc.

The 250/350 6.7, Tremor package Superduties only, are identical so wouldn’t all 250’s be rated to 11500? Why do they bother with 10800? I understand the de-rate to 10,000 for certain states and registration. Also understand payload will change with trim and accessories but why doesn’t Ford just rate all 250’s to 11,500 if they are truly bolt for bolt the same? So take trim and accessories minus 11,500.
 
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Minus the legality of payload sticker and hauling and insurance with regard to accidents etc.

The 250/350 6.7 are identical so wouldn’t all 250’s be rated to 11500? Why do they bother with 10800? I understand the de-rate to 10,000 for certain states and registration. Also understand payload will change with trim and accessories but why doesn’t Ford just rate all 250’s to 11,500 if they are truly bolt for bolt the same? So take trim and accessories minus 11,500.
Not gonna claim to be an expert, but I think when you are reading statements about bolt-for-bolt matching between F250 and F350, they are referring to the Tremor in particular, not necessarily across all trims/packages when comparing the 250 vs 350. As far as why do they have the differences in payload on the Tremor, I'm going to guess it comes down to $$$. Ford simply charges more for you to have the higher payload. That's just speculation on my part.
 
Not gonna claim to be an expert, but I think when you are reading statements about bolt-for-bolt matching between F250 and F350, they are referring to the Tremor in particular, not necessarily across all trims/packages when comparing the 250 vs 350. As far as why do they have the differences in payload on the Tremor, I'm going to guess it comes down to $$$. Ford simply charges more for you to have the higher payload. That's just speculation on my part.
Yes just talking about all Superduty Tremors not Fx4 etc. I understand payload will be different within the Tremor line depending on trim and accessories but why wouldn’t they just rate the 250 tremor to the 350 tremor (11,500) if its true they’re identical.
 
250 hctp and 350 are the same across the line. Tremor or not. 10,800 saves registration $$, CDL requirements and weigh station requirements. 350 to me is the one that makes no sense since it pushes you into a lot of unnecessary legal crap. The difference is in the sticker and the badging.
 
Mostly a backwards case of you get what you pay for. Your only paying for the 10k+ rating so you get that sticker. Yes they share components but you didn't pay the extra $1k for the extra 1k lbs on the rating.

Plenty of vehicles produced out their with high ratings but if they were used to that max they wouldn't last long. Ford made a choice not to have to make two versions of the tremor components. This is also why it's only available on a certain frame/can configuration.
 
Minus the legality of payload sticker and hauling and insurance with regard to accidents etc.

The 250/350 6.7, Tremor package Superduties only, are identical so wouldn’t all 250’s be rated to 11500? Why do they bother with 10800? I understand the de-rate to 10,000 for certain states and registration. Also understand payload will change with trim and accessories but why doesn’t Ford just rate all 250’s to 11,500 if they are truly bolt for bolt the same? So take trim and accessories minus 11,500.

I have wondered the exact same thing. If it has the Tremor package, the ratings should be the same for the F250 vs F350.
 
Considering the suspensions are identical (talking tremors only), and the only differences seem to be the payload sticker, side emblem, and a bit more cost for a 350.....legalities aside, (and I am not saying I would want to do this, I am just trying to understand the physics between the two), could you effectively push the limit of the payload sticker of a 250 to that of an exact same equipped 350?
 
I mean technically you shouldn't have any issues. Also technically you could probably load 6k lbs in the bed and be fine too. Spend some time watching guys leaving home depot over loaded. Tremor would probably handle that better than 2004 Silverados I see doing it all the time. 2 pallets of concrete.....
 
Considering the suspensions are identical (talking tremors only), and the only differences seem to be the payload sticker, side emblem, and a bit more cost for a 350.....legalities aside, (and I am not saying I would want to do this, I am just trying to understand the physics between the two), could you effectively push the limit of the payload sticker of a 250 to that of an exact same equipped 350?
Given the F-250 and F-350 Tremors are mechanically identical: yes, you could do that from a safety and mechanical perspective.

I know you said “legalities aside”, but I still want to emphasize that you cannot do it legally and there may be insurance issues if you got into an accident while overloaded. Also I’m not a lawyer. ;)
 
Minus the legality of payload sticker and hauling and insurance with regard to accidents etc.

The 250/350 6.7, Tremor package Superduties only, are identical so wouldn’t all 250’s be rated to 11500? Why do they bother with 10800? I understand the de-rate to 10,000 for certain states and registration. Also understand payload will change with trim and accessories but why doesn’t Ford just rate all 250’s to 11,500 if they are truly bolt for bolt the same? So take trim and accessories minus 11,500.
So the 250 Tremor should pull a 21900 gooseneck like the 350 tremor instead of 18100 that the 250 is rated for
 
Keep in mind also this is a marketing game Ford is playing to best the Ram Power Wagon. Ford is marketing the widest range of Super Duty models with both off road capability and substantially superior towing and payload capacity than what Ram offers, including both gas and diesel options. If they listed all capacities the same for 250 and 350 they would essentially be eliminating all F250 configurations from the list of models available because everything by rating would be a 350. Sounds silly but by doing this Ford doubled the number of model variants that are available as a Tremor. Call it smoke and mirrors but by derating the 250, they aren't having to produce different component packages for the "lighter" half of the Tremor package offerings, just a more conservative rating on the load sticker. That comes with some legal ramifications on the part of the buyer, especially once you know they are identical in design. Still Ford has satisfied everything they need to be able to say they offer "X" number of models available with the Tremor package as compared to the Power Wagon. It would be considered marketing genius from the bean counters perspective. Additionally it does also help buyers that would otherwise be penalized if their state considers the F350 and its payload rating a commercial class vehicle. Just choose the derated F250 and avoid the penalties and have a truck with at least the same level of durability in design.
 
Given the F-250 and F-350 Tremors are mechanically identical: yes, you could do that from a safety and mechanical perspective.

I know you said “legalities aside”, but I still want to emphasize that you cannot do it legally and there may be insurance issues if you got into an accident while overloaded. Also I’m not a lawyer. ;)
Understood, I would never risk that for sure. But knowing my 250 is mechanically the same as the 350 mentally makes me feel better.....LOL
 
Understood, I would never risk that for sure. But knowing my 250 is mechanically the same as the 350 mentally makes me feel better.....LOL

I considered the same things when I ordered my F250 Tremor. I knew they were the same mechanically, so I was not concerned about getting the biggest payload number in my door jamb for an extra $1K out of my pocket. I will not use the mine to the limits of the F250 number, but I know it can handle it and much more without issues.
 
I’m curious: Technically, since were talking grey area, wouldn’t it be the case that the lowest GVWR F250 would have the greatest tow capacity (GCVWR) from a legal perspective for non-CDL drivers since the GCVWR isn’t on the sticker?

i.e. Since federal CDL threshold is 26K#, as computed by GVWR on door jamb plus GVWR on trailer, a 10K# GVWR would allow for a 16K# trailer on the scales rather than the 14.5K# left over for the 11.5K# 350.

Also, since towing capacity isn’t listed on the truck other than for payload (tongue weight) and hitch capacity, wouldn’t the legal limit from a liability perspective be different than what Ford publishes in their fleet guides?

@ccw?
 
Adding to this: My experience buying trailers has been that most HD trailers de-rated to be under CDL assume a truck with a 10K# GVWR.

The max capacity equipment/dump trailers I pull would be above CDL limits with a 10800# or 11500# sticker on the truck.
 
I’ve been in the market for a new medium duty low profile dump trailer.

The model I’m looking at has available GVWR of 15.4K, 16.4K, or 17.2K (heavy duty). (All 12-13k payload.)

Wouldn’t it be the case that with any Tremor other than the 250 Gas one would need a CDL to pull these?
 
I’m curious: Technically, since were talking grey area, wouldn’t it be the case that the lowest GVWR F250 would have the greatest tow capacity (GCVWR) from a legal perspective for non-CDL drivers since the GCVWR isn’t on the sticker?

i.e. Since federal CDL threshold is 26K#, as computed by GVWR on door jamb plus GVWR on trailer, a 10K# GVWR would allow for a 16K# trailer on the scales rather than the 14.5K# left over for the 11.5K# 350.

Also, since towing capacity isn’t listed on the truck other than for payload (tongue weight) and hitch capacity, wouldn’t the legal limit from a liability perspective be different than what Ford publishes in their fleet guides?

@ccw?
The 26k limit in most states is not a CDL requirement, but rather a "class A exempt" requirement, as in exempt from CDL. Unless of course you are pulling for commercial purposes, in which the "C" in CDL comes into play. Commiefornia is one of the only states that make drivers get a CDL when they aren't actually driving a commercial vehicle.


EDIT - This looks like CA also would only require a class a exempt when non commercial:


Hawaii says it needs a CDL for non commercial heavy trailers:

 
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