New Driver's Door Lock Mod (Theft Protection)

I did the lock cylinder and lock pull delete so I added a set of R2X remote battery terminals using 4 AWG gauge with 3/8 lugs. I was able to tuck it behind fog lights on the passenger side so I can access it with a jump box. I know you can also attach a jump box to the starter but didn't want to have to crawl under the truck if the need arises.
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View attachment 141891
An additional way is to add a "lug" to the front passenger wheel well connecting to the passenger side battery. Just connect a + 12v power source to the lug and connect a ground just about anywhere and it will supply ample power for the key fob to open the door locks.
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I am considering this device wo the keyhole. Anyone have any additional feedback on this device? Anyone had an attempted or successfully theft with this device?
I was also wondering if, in the event the batteries died, you could power the truck enough to use the key fob to unlock the truck, if power was applied through a modified 7 pin trailer plug.
Thanks in advance for any replies
I believe the trailer connector has no voltage once the truck is off.

There is one problem many overlook with using a stud to parallel a source to open the door with a FOB. IF the truck battery has been drained low enough, a parallel source will first attempt to charge the batteries back up. This may deplete a small 12V source to low enough, that the FOB may not work. In a case where the battery was drained and the truck is locked, you may need a significant source such as one of the Noco jump start batteries (which is likely locked up in the truck) or another "truck" battery to give it enough voltage to operate. There would also be a need to address the "reason" it was drained, if there is a short, the external battery would also be shorted when connected.

But for simplicity, and the most likely scenario, an external stud is good, with the Noco.

What I did was install an auxiliary battery in the bed and have a switch to engage it if needed for power on the truck battery. The bed is covered with a locked Diamond Back cover, and all is not seen under normal conditions. This is probably not for everyone, but it is a secure method with a power source in the event of an emergency by unlocking the DB and flipping the switch. I use the external battery to run other stuff when camping to avoid using the truck batteries.

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I believe the trailer connector has no voltage once the truck is off.

There is one problem many overlook with using a stud to parallel a source to open the door with a FOB. IF the truck battery has been drained low enough, a parallel source will first attempt to charge the batteries back up. This may deplete a small 12V source to low enough, that the FOB may not work. In a case where the battery was drained and the truck is locked, you may need a significant source such as one of the Noco jump start batteries (which is likely locked up in the truck) or another "truck" battery to give it enough voltage to operate. There would also be a need to address the "reason" it was drained, if there is a short, the external battery would also be shorted when connected.

But for simplicity, and the most likely scenario, an external stud is good, with the Noco.

What I did was install an auxiliary battery in the bed and have a switch to engage it if needed for power on the truck battery. The bed is covered with a locked Diamond Back cover, and all is not seen under normal conditions. This is probably not for everyone, but it is a secure method with a power source in the event of an emergency by unlocking the DB and flipping the switch. I use the external battery to run other stuff when camping to avoid using the truck batteries.

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Not sure your speaking of the external lug method I mentioned above, but it works flawlessly for what it's intended, to simply add enough power so the FOB can open the truck. It's been tested throughly. I will also add not very often will you find a dual battery vehicle that is so drained it will not activate the door locks and that is ONLY what it was designed and intended to do.
 
I did the simplest most effective method and wired a hidden plug directly to the door lock actuator circuit.. A tiny 9V (or 12V camera) battery will get me in, then I can pop the hood.
I like the concept, but if your truck battery is "dead", the actuator would have to be isolated from the truck battery before that would work. Else the 9V battery sees essentially a "short". (A dead battery lower than 9V, would be in parallel with the small battery, draining it instantly. This assumes the actuator has battery connection at all times, waiting for the negative logic to activate. I have not looked at the schematic to determine this.) Unfortunately, the only way to test it would be to completely drain the truck battery and hook up the small battery.
 
Not sure your speaking of the external lug method I mentioned above, but it works flawlessly for what it's intended, to simply add enough power so the FOB can open the truck. It's been tested throughly. I will also add not very often will you find a dual battery vehicle that is so drained it will not activate the door locks and that is ONLY what it was designed and intended to do.
It would work fine if your battery were only "low" and not drained. (The most likely scenario, as I mentioned above) If it is drained due to a short, it would not work. To test this theory, unhook the truck batteries, short the two leads to each other, and try to hook up another source. Watch out for sparks.

I had a scenario where the batteries (older truck) were completely drained, pulled them out and tried to install another battery only to see large arcs. The glow plug relay had shorted out to chassis.
 
I like the concept, but if your truck battery is "dead", the actuator would have to be isolated from the truck battery before that would work. Else the 9V battery sees essentially a "short". (A dead battery lower than 9V, would be in parallel with the small battery, draining it instantly. This assumes the actuator has battery connection at all times, waiting for the negative logic to activate. I have not looked at the schematic to determine this.) Unfortunately, the only way to test it would be to completely drain the truck battery and hook up the small battery.
I've tested it a few times and it's worked great. If you can find the schematic, I really appreciate it.
 
It would work fine if your battery were only "low" and not drained. (The most likely scenario, as I mentioned above) If it is drained due to a short, it would not work. To test this theory, unhook the truck batteries, short the two leads to each other, and try to hook up another source. Watch out for sparks.

I had a scenario where the batteries (older truck) were completely drained, pulled them out and tried to install another battery only to see large arcs. The glow plug relay had shorted out to chassis.
I know your intentions are genuine and sincere, but I'm not worried about the rare short situation you speak of, nor am I concerned about my dual battery truck draining to that extent. If I somehow find myself in the situation you speak of I will deal with it then. My feelings it's an extremely rare occurrence and I am confident in what I have in place. I myself have been guilty of overthinking solutions and many do, but not worried about this particular one. At least my truck is still where I left it.
 
I've tested it a few times and it's worked great. If you can find the schematic, I really appreciate it.
You're correct, the actuator should be able to be actuated in the event a dead battery is encountered.

It is likely that since the control is through the BCM/DCM, that the actuator would be isolated enough for the small battery to work, hooked directly to the actuator terminals even if the truck batteries were completely dead. The actuator is negatively controlled, but the communications would be disabled if the truck battery were dead.

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There are numerous types of actuator connectors, some simple, some multipin. Did you just hook directly to the actuator motor? otr into the connector?

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I know your intentions are genuine and sincere, but I'm not worried about the rare short situation you speak of, nor am I concerned about my dual battery truck draining to that extent. If I somehow find myself in the situation you speak of I will deal with it then. My feelings it's an extremely rare occurrence and I am confident in what I have in place. I myself have been guilty of overthinking solutions and many do, but not worried about this particular one. At least my truck is still where I left it.
For the record, I like what you did most, it's simple and effective in most all cases. 👍
 
You're correct, the actuator should be able to be actuated in the event a dead battery is encountered.

It is likely that since the control is through the BCM/DCM, that the actuator would be isolated enough for the small battery to work, hooked directly to the actuator terminals even if the truck batteries were completely dead. The actuator is negatively controlled, but the communications would be disabled if the truck battery were dead.

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View attachment 141899

There are numerous types of actuator connectors, some simple, some multipin. Did you just hook directly to the actuator motor? otr into the connector?
Hook to these two wires, located in the harness channel. It will unlock 3 of the 4 doors, in case one of the doors is defective.

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Let us know how you like it. Sure seems a lot more convenient than doing a door handle swap.
I have one and I felt like yes the bastards still got in by the small glass break they attempted to twist the lock first but the cover did its job and the locking cylinder still in one piece.
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I've been thinking about this and was wondering if a thin square of hardened material that's difficult to penetrate might be stuck to the window where the thieves typically drill though. It would have to be tough enough to deter or slow them down but thin enough to allow the window to still roll down. Not a perfect solution, but that plus the lock calendar sleeve might be enough for them to pick an easier target.
 
I've been thinking about this and was wondering if a thin square of hardened material that's difficult to penetrate might be stuck to the window where the thieves typically drill though. It would have to be tough enough to deter or slow them down but thin enough to allow the window to still roll down. Not a perfect solution, but that plus the lock calendar sleeve might be enough for them to pick an easier target.
I think any visual deterrent could help but the enterprising thief is still going to try to get in. Pulling the lock rods seems to be the best visual deterrent. Putting the shroud on the lock may help as well, but same, pulling it would be a better deterrent.
 
Hook to these two wires, located in the harness channel. It will unlock 3 of the 4 doors, in case one of the doors is defective.

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My new-to-me pickup has these two wires t-tapped and they run to the rear for what i assume was a topper of some sort based on the harness that was used. I've verified the unlock signal via a DMM.

I see you have a black and red wire. Am I correct in assuming you would just apply + to the red and - to the black from a 9v and it will unlock three of the doors?

Could a guy test this even with a charged starter battery? (asking for a friend :) )
 
Am I correct in assuming you would just apply + to the red and - to the black from a 9v and it will unlock three of the doors?

Could a guy test this even with a charged starter battery? (asking for a friend :) )
Correct! Not sure if 9V is enough though!
 
Correct! Not sure if 9V is enough though!
I was going to PM you but figured someone else might benefit from my question...

I'm extremely tempted to test this but i just got the truck and really dont want to mess up anything.

Can i safely quell my curiosity by putting a 1A inline fuse on the positive, hooking up the ground wire, then just tapping the positive wire to the + post on a 12v battery I have?
Even if my starter battery is fully charged?
 
I was going to PM you but figured someone else might benefit from my question...

I'm extremely tempted to test this but i just got the truck and really dont want to mess up anything.

Can i safely quell my curiosity by putting a 1A inline fuse on the positive, hooking up the ground wire, then just tapping the positive wire to the + post on a 12v battery I have?
Even if my starter battery is fully charged?
Yes. I don't even have a fuse on mine if that says anything. I would be curious to see if a 12V camera battery or garage door opener battery would have enough juice to unlock the 3 doors.
 
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