Need advice for a Hi-Lift or not.

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FT_Guest3342

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I've had my truck for 3 weeks now and have it mostly equipped for anything. But I am torn between getting a Hi-Lift jack for it and not getting one. I know the first time I have to change a tire on the truck I will be kicking myself if I have to use that silly bottle jack.

The problem is that I have the stock bumpers and there really isn't a place to put a Hi-Lift under to lift. On my Jeep there is armor all around and you can jack from any corner, side, front, back... But not so with the truck. Basically you could use the 2 tow points in the front and the trailer hitch in the back. I guess you could lift it by the tire spokes but then you would need a block under it to take the tire off.
 
I've had my truck for 3 weeks now and have it mostly equipped for anything. But I am torn between getting a Hi-Lift jack for it and not getting one. I know the first time I have to change a tire on the truck I will be kicking myself if I have to use that silly bottle jack.

The problem is that I have the stock bumpers and there really isn't a place to put a Hi-Lift under to lift. On my Jeep there is armor all around and you can jack from any corner, side, front, back... But not so with the truck. Basically you could use the 2 tow points in the front and the trailer hitch in the back. I guess you could lift it by the tire spokes but then you would need a block under it to take the tire off.
IMO a Hi-Lift is useless for jacking modern vehicles unless you swap bumpers and add rock sliders so you have lift points.

I would get a better bottle jack, with longer reach and extensions (e.g. Safe Jack), before a Hi-Lift assuming you stick with stock bumpers. If you want the ability to hand winch, consider a come-along.
 
I might add that I got the winch with my truck so if there was a tree anywhere near and it was a front tire to change you can bet your bottom dollar, the winch and a tree protector strap is doing it. Like this LOL.


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Where do you think you will be changing a tire?

if its in the garage or drive fine. Do you think you will need to make change on the trail? If so then yes get one.
Where would you lift from on the front that wouldn't have the Hi-Lift hitting the front bumper? I know you can lift from the wheels, but obviously that doesn't help with changing a tire. :D

I've picked up a Safe Jack bottle jack kit with the base plate so it should be stable on dirt and rocks.
 
If I am at home, I would use the floor jack, obviously. When out and about or on a trail, I would use something else to lift the truck to change a tire. With my 2013 F150 I think I had to change a tire on the road 4 times once was in a parking lot, once I plugged it on the side of the road. I never broke a bead with it but it didn't go off-road either.
 
I personally like a nice multi stage bottle jack much more than a hi-lift for tire change. There are a lot of uses for a hi-lift other than changing tires but for this truck not so much for tire changing. Like some have said a piece of 2x12 and a bottle jack works. Also I like lifting under the axle if possible so I don't have to raise the truck so high. Usually about 3-5 inches of lift gets the tire off the ground and that is a whole lot safer, especially off pavement. Just my two cents. Here's an example:

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PS: This and the board will fit in the space behind the seat in place of the factory jack.
 

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Where would you lift from on the front that wouldn't have the Hi-Lift hitting the front bumper? I know you can lift from the wheels, but obviously that doesn't help with changing a tire. :D

I've picked up a Safe Jack bottle jack kit with the base plate so it should be stable on dirt and rocks.
To lift either front corner just put the Hi-Lift on the tow hook. The jack is made with a hook on the front for just such a lift. You can lift from the wheel and it would be fine if all you had to do was reseat a bead. Otherwise you would need to make a pile of something under the axle to let it down on to change the tire.
 
I carry a couple of bottle jacks in the back toolbox and have used them on multiple occasions. I place the bottle jack under the axle and lift it from there. If I get under the truck without the wheel (working on the brakes, etc.) I always transfer the load from the bottle jack to a jackstand. I don’t use the jack that comes with the truck. In my opinion, the bottle jacks are much easier to use.
 
It's kind of like the tires. Each is only rated for about 4k pounds. You're only lifting one corner.
Just make sure you are actually lifting only one corner and not, for example, the rear receiver which would lift the whole rear end. I bring that up as the rear receiver could be a logical place to lift from. :)

But yes, if you’re lifting under the axles then you‘ll definitely only be lifting one corner at a time.
 
Just make sure you are actually lifting only one corner and not, for example, the rear receiver which would lift the whole rear end. I bring that up as the rear receiver could be a logical place to lift from. :)

But yes, if you’re lifting under the axles then you‘ll definitely only be lifting one corner at a time.
I don't like lifting by the frame if at all possible due to the suspension flex you encounter. Under the axle as close to the hub as possible is the most stable and requires the least amount of lift.

I personally would buy at least a 6 ton jack for safety sake. It's really no bigger to speak of than a two ton and it makes it a whole lot more versatile. ?
 
Yep. upgrade your Bottle Jack and carry a couple small pieces of 2x6. 2x8 is even better. Stack'm. Shorter the lift height, the better. Best part is breaking the Lugs loose. At least get yourself a 4 way, if you don't already have a cordless impact.
 
Agree w/ @RedZilla and @ccw

If you need to change a tire, lift under the axle, right near the tire. This means you do not have to unload the spring to get the tire off the ground. You only need enough lift to get the tire off and the replacement tire on. And, as has been said, if you lift one corner, you do not need a jack that is capable of lifting the entire truck.

For tire changing, the high lift jack seems to me to be the wrong tool. A bottle jack or a floor jack is better. The short piece of wood allows for maneuvering the floor jack on the gravel that you often see on roadsides. (And, as has been said, a block of wood under the bottle jack means you shorten the amount of jack extension.) I know one fellow who removed the wheels from his portable floor jack and welded on a steel skid plate (it was shaped like a sled) so he could use it in off road situations. Genius!

If you like the bottle jack solution, Safe Jack has some pretty cool jacks and accessories, along with some nice storage bags.

I'd be interested to see how high you'd have to extend a high lift jack, situated at one of the front recovery points, to get a front tire off the ground.
 
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My thoughts... I Hi-Lift isn't just a lift... it's a recovery tool as it has many uses and proper training should be had by those that want to get their money's worth and some. I'm a believer that gear we carry in our trucks should have multiple uses so as to minimize carrying extra gear that is single use case only. A Hi-Lift meets this criteria for me as a very versatile tool since it can be used for winching, recovery and lifting a vehicle (mine or others') on the road and on the trails. It can even help with de-beading a tire for tire repair situations. I personally have a Hi-Lift extreme model and was trained on how to properly use it in various scenarios on my truck in adverse conditions by Morrison's Outdoor Adventures (the lead trainer Mike Morrison is the real deal and he himself uses a Hi-Lift for recovery situations with his full size diesel truck). When used properly a Hi-Lift can easily help with tire changes on-road and with some know how, do the same off-road.

One thing to consider, in adverse conditions, getting under a vehicle to lift the truck (i.e. under an axle) may be difficult or impossible to do depending on the situation. With a full size truck like ours, a Hi-Lift allows you to use the lift on the outsides of the vehicle... specifically away from danger. In ideal conditions it's arguably easier and faster to use bottle jacks or some form of "offroad rolling jack" that I see advertised all over these days. But if you prepare for ideal condition recoveries then you open yourself to being unprepared for that one time conditions aren't ideal.

For our trucks if you need to change a tire, simply attach the Hi-Lift to the front Tow-Hook or the rear receiver. In the front I use a soft shackle to create a loop through the tow hook. In the rear I use a Factor55 receiver tow point and then a D-ring through that.... from there attach the soft-shackle to the D-ring and lift away. A Hi-Lift Extreme easily handles the load of my 6.7PS Tremor.

But beware, there's a lot of fakes out there offering cheaper solutions... but there's only one "Hi-Lift"... specifically the shearing pin is their magic. Under too much load, the pin shears and the jack stays lifted... all others fail and the jack drops and if you're under the truck, that's a bad day.
 
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