Lug nut socket size and torque wrench suggestions…

Duh. I need a cup of coffee, obviously, Tekton, not Techron. Sheesh.
 
Duh. I need a cup of coffee, obviously, Tekton, not Techron. Sheesh.
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Coffee will clean you out too lol.
 
I've been using that Craftsman torque wrench for a while now. The only thing that bothers me is the timeout of the screen. You will have to turn it back on a few times during the process of torquing all the lug nuts.

I've also been using the Centramatics for a while through multiple wheel/tire combos. I still get the wheels balanced at a shop, but I take them off first and mount them myself. Those guys will destroy your wheels and painted hubs in a heartbeat. They seem to help most with the final, or small vibrations. They seem to remove all shake and provide an extremely smooth ride.
 
I've been pondering purchasing a Milwaukee impact and sockets like @RedZilla purchased and finally decided to pull the trigger. Where he bought his impact was out of stock so the search was on for another source. I found it at Summit Racing for the same price with the addition of a free 2.5ahr High Output battery and free shipping. Pretty good deal. I wanted to stay compact so I stuck with the 12v instead of the 18v posted above. This is my first of hopefully many Milwaukee tools so I will be looking to expand my 12v inventory.

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How’s the M12 Fuel impact work out for the lug nuts? I’ve had a M12 Fuel 3/8” impact for several years but have never tried it on lug nuts, honestly don’t think it would remove them. And I always torque lug nuts to spec, vs running them down tight with an air impact as some folks do.
 
How’s the M12 Fuel impact work out for the lug nuts? I’ve had a M12 Fuel 3/8” impact for several years but have never tried it on lug nuts, honestly don’t think it would remove them. And I always torque lug nuts to spec, vs running them down tight with an air impact as some folks do.
Thought I'd throw this out here,
I would expect the M12 (3/8 inch) driver would not be good enough, it has a max torque of 1400 lb. inches. (~117 lb. ft.) The reason that's important is because removing the lugs will take quite a bit of force. They're supposed to be torqued to 150 lb. Ft. (depending on the manual you use) and may "seat" even tighter over time. The M12 may work when fully charged in ideal conditions, but for emergencies, I wouldn't chance it myself. On the other hand, you could always break the lugs manually and then use the M12 for fast removal. Then reverse and hand tighten again in a pinch.

From the manual:
Bolt Size lb.ft (Nm) 1
M14 x 1.5 150 lb.ft (204 Nm)
Torque specifications are for nut and bolt threads free of dirt and rust. Use only our recommended replacement wheel nuts... and so on.

I use the M18 impact, which I keep in the truck with a battery and charger. The M18 version (1/2 inch) can produce >400 lb. ft. I've never had a problem removing lugs on any truck. And the battery lasts a long time without recharging.
 
I've had this m18 for years and it's an absolute beast. No hesitation when removing lug nuts, it's handy to have when working on anything larger. I keep it right in one of those undercover swingcases and just make sure to pull the battery once a month for a fresh one.
 
Awesome. We can exchange opinions on it:) mine arrives tomorrow and i plan to give centramatics another try so will be using it pretty soon.


What’s everyone’s opinion been so far on this craftsmen dig wrench. Mine has been good so far, no issues, as good as the non digital one. Is it a lot better, probably, but for lug nuts job it ain't that much of a difference really.

Mounted my 37” spare into rotation for the first time.
 

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What’s everyone’s opinion been so far on this craftsmen dig wrench. Mine has been good so far, no issues, as good as the non digital one. Is it a lot better, probably, but for lug nuts job it ain't that much of a difference really.

Mounted my 37” spare into rotation for the first time.
I haven't had to use mine yet... Someday soon I'm sure on either the Tremor or the Jeep.
 
What’s everyone’s opinion been so far on this craftsmen dig wrench. Mine has been good so far, no issues, as good as the non digital one. Is it a lot better, probably, but for lug nuts job it ain't that much of a difference really.

Mounted my 37” spare into rotation for the first time.
Seems to work well. I like it better than my Husky clicker.
 
Milwaukee rep ..."IF properly implemented....."

So all it takes it one guy to screw it all up...and the whole party is screwed....literally. :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:

So don't use Milwaukee tools for torquing stuff fellas. Back to work.

Not to mention the whole torque range they are falling into with the "target" specs. Being 7-10% off target isn't good, not to mention the actual calibration to standard deviation of the tool. So being people are using "new math" adjusting the tool to the target value to include the calibration deviation value might make this job position require an engineering degree for some people.

Sorry...20 years of aviation experience had to laugh out loud.
 
100 agree. I was using 21mm until i switched to 13/16, what a difference in tightness.

Lots of posts, in this thread, about socket snugness. Keep in mind that doesn't apply the same way as way back when we used 6 point sockets that grabbed the corners of a nut. Today's good quality sockets apply force to the flat area of the nut; not the corners. So they will feel "looser" than the sockets of old, but that is by design.
 
Not to mention the whole torque range they are falling into with the "target" specs. Being 7-10% off target isn't good, not to mention the actual calibration to standard deviation of the tool.
The use case is very specific: high volume repetition of the same torque in the field. They aren't building rockets, they are building solar arrays. I think this is far better than the 2 step process and +/- 10% is fine for that application. As with a manual torque wrench the accuracy probably gets worse the further you are from its calibration point.

Don't forget the average monkey just holds the trigger until it stops, which can strip a lot of smaller fasteners. I even saw a video recently where the revered A-Rod was torquing down a PPE transmission pan (in a circular pattern too!) with a Milwaukee mini-impact and I cringed at the thought.

It sounds like there's some setup involved so this isn't something you should just whip out and trust like an adjustable torque wrench. I agree with you it shouldn't be confused with an assembly tool, but those aren't practical in the field either.
 
Any thoughts on getting a high quality socket?? I'm not buying a whole set of impact sockets, but would surely buy a nice single. I only remove 2 different bolts or nuts on this truck. Drain plug and lug nuts.
 
I carry the following for flat services:
  1. 1/2" dewalt impact
  2. 6" extension with a flip socket (both impact rated)
  3. 1/2" torque wrench i've had for years that is "good/close enough for roadside emergency"
  4. 1/2" to 3/8" reducer (why you ask? see below)
  5. 3/8" by 24" extension
 
As with a manual torque wrench the accuracy probably gets worse the further you are from its calibration point.

Well there's the catch of sorts. A good ol' fashioned TQ wrench can have a overall deviation or a ranging deviation. Usually the paperwork shows that data, on the higher TQ equipment it tends to be the ranging deviation.

They aren't building rockets, they are building solar arrays.

I agree....but contractual specifications could be driving the bus over "what" is being built. I'm pretty confident that any 100MW+ array has some pretty specific contractual clauses to include defining "installation to manufacturers specifications". Not to mention possible "warranty for repairs and replacements" of items under a term of service. So if the defect or damage is at your expense it can get expensive.
Let's be real : There's money to be made doing MW solar farms, no one WANTS to go out the the field multiple times cause that eats up profits. Let's do it right the first time, and never need to go back (so to say).
 

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