Let's see pics of times you embraced your inner MacGyver

Gymkata

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Hey all,

Of course when it's regarding something safety related, it's important to have the right tool/equipment for the job...but for other things it can get expensive to buy a specific piece of kit for every need.

Show me examples of times you used whatever you had laying around to "make it work". This should be fun. I'm sure examples can range from super sloppy to downright ingenious...let's see them all!!!

I'll start since I'm bad about this on a regular basis. On one hand I'll spend thousands on a set of shocks, but on the other hand (as shown in the pics) I'll be too cheap to buy a proper bike rack before my upcoming 7000 mile cross country trip and MacGyver what I have on hand. :rolleyes::unsure::ROFLMAO:

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Great thread idea!!
 
Hey all,

Of course when it's regarding something safety related, it's important to have the right tool/equipment for the job...but for other things it can get expensive to buy a specific piece of kit for every need.

Show me examples of times you used whatever you had laying around to "make it work". This should be fun. I'm sure examples can range from super sloppy to downright ingenious...let's see them all!!!

I'll start since I'm bad about this on a regular basis. On one hand I'll spend thousands on a set of shocks, but on the other hand (as shown in the pics) I'll be too cheap to buy a proper bike rack before my upcoming 7000 mile cross country trip and MacGyver what I have on hand. :rolleyes::unsure::ROFLMAO:

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Great thread idea, I've been wondering about a column with inventions; this will work. I'd love to see people's creativity to overcome situational problems.

Here's one of mine, a way to remove the pawl from the door locks for a delete of the lock rods.

I grabbed these lockring pliers and modified them to spread the pawl.

Without these, the pawl can break very easily and can be a difficult access inside some doors. Experimentation with grind thickness was key.

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Sheared the locating pin in the leaf pack. Hit a rock and the axle and bolts slid backward. 20 miles off pavement on the north side of the Grand Canyon. Used a high lift jack and a couple pieces of chain hooked to the rear block/u bolts and around the front radius arm bracket. I was able to pull the axle back into place and get the slip yoke back on. Drove 2,000 miles home like this. Jammed a bolt into the top hole and used a bungee to hold it in place. Ratchet strap from the U bolt to a hole in the frame to keep the axle from sliding back. It couldn't go forward without crushing the drive shaft.

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Sheared the locating pin in the leaf pack. Hit a rock and the axle and bolts slid backward. 20 miles off pavement on the north side of the Grand Canyon. Used a high lift jack and a couple pieces of chain hooked to the rear block/u bolts and around the front radius arm bracket. I was able to pull the axle back into place and get the slip yoke back on. Drove 2,000 miles home like this. Jammed a bolt into the top hole and used a bungee to hold it in place. Ratchet strap from the U bolt to a hole in the frame to keep the axle from sliding back. It couldn't go forward without crushing the drive shaft.

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Mad props on that trail repair!
 
Sheared the locating pin in the leaf pack. Hit a rock and the axle and bolts slid backward. 20 miles off pavement on the north side of the Grand Canyon. Used a high lift jack and a couple pieces of chain hooked to the rear block/u bolts and around the front radius arm bracket. I was able to pull the axle back into place and get the slip yoke back on. Drove 2,000 miles home like this. Jammed a bolt into the top hole and used a bungee to hold it in place. Ratchet strap from the U bolt to a hole in the frame to keep the axle from sliding back. It couldn't go forward without crushing the drive shaft.

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We have a winner.
 
Sheared the locating pin in the leaf pack. Hit a rock and the axle and bolts slid backward. 20 miles off pavement on the north side of the Grand Canyon. Used a high lift jack and a couple pieces of chain hooked to the rear block/u bolts and around the front radius arm bracket. I was able to pull the axle back into place and get the slip yoke back on. Drove 2,000 miles home like this. Jammed a bolt into the top hole and used a bungee to hold it in place. Ratchet strap from the U bolt to a hole in the frame to keep the axle from sliding back. It couldn't go forward without crushing the drive shaft.

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Holy shit. Well done.
 
I have photos on a HD that I forgot the cress to, and I just have not brute forced it yet. I have used a Gatorade bottle, .50 call ammo can, and wooden RPG cases all as splice boxes for fiber optic cable. I did this throughout Iraq from 2007-2008, and only had EOD blow it up once.

This destruction is from a lob bomb attack on Camp Rustamiyah during a sand storm. This destroyed CRAM communication equipment and telco to include wireless communications.

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Sheared the locating pin in the leaf pack. Hit a rock and the axle and bolts slid backward. 20 miles off pavement on the north side of the Grand Canyon. Used a high lift jack and a couple pieces of chain hooked to the rear block/u bolts and around the front radius arm bracket. I was able to pull the axle back into place and get the slip yoke back on. Drove 2,000 miles home like this. Jammed a bolt into the top hole and used a bungee to hold it in place. Ratchet strap from the U bolt to a hole in the frame to keep the axle from sliding back. It couldn't go forward without crushing the drive shaft.

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And some say that Hi-Lift jacks aren't good for anything! ;)
 
I took my mom with me when I shopped for my Land Cruiser. I'd observed her needing a bit more help getting into my Grand Cherokee as she aged and the LC was just a bit higher. Not intending to give up on the 'Cruiser, I came up with a plan.

I used some leftover lumber I had plus a few things from my junk box and a few things from the hardware store and cobbled together a portable step for her to use to climb into the 'Cruiser when I drove her around. It worked out just fine. Strong and stable.

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When you bend the 💩out of your roller guide bracket at the ramp 300 miles from home.

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Just curious how hot you have to be coming in to bend what looks to be pretty stout metal or did the trailer driver just back into the water way too fast and the water bent it?
 
I took my mom with me when I shopped for my Land Cruiser. I'd observed her needing a bit more help getting into my Grand Cherokee as she aged and the LC was just a bit higher. Not intending to give up on the 'Cruiser, I came up with a plan.

I used some leftover lumber I had plus a few things from my junk box and a few things from the hardware store and cobbled together a portable step for her to use to climb into the 'Cruiser when I drove her around. It worked out just fine. Strong and stable.

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You could park your truck on that thing! 😜
 
I was going to post my latest bit of inspired goofiness and recalled an older one that has worked out as well as I could possibly imagine, so here are both.

When not traveling which is most of the time, I like to use my laptop as a home theater PC for couch surfing, full screening YT and other videos, etc. I do the vast majority of my reading and posting on this site using this setup.

How does one set a laptop on a home theater stack without the receiver and computer cooking each other to death? Heat's gotta get out. Enter the best wacky home theater accessory I ever dreamed up.

If the wood component looks familiar somehow, yes, it's a Pioneer Woman chopping block I bought at Walmart for around $25. Add four plastic replacement feet for metal chairs from the local Ace hardware and some screws with wide flanges like built in washers, a little measuring, drilling and screwing, and you have a nice heat resistant platform for your computer that lets both it and the receiver breathe without melting down, plus it's rather decorative!

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I finally got to test something I did last weekend a couple days ago. During the morning hours until noon or one+ the sun shines on the concrete floor of my shop/man cave and blinds the obstruction sensor on the big door. That's very inconvenient since the only way to get the door down is to stand outside holding a huge piece of cardboard or the like along with the door remote and try to provide enough shade to get the door down or you're stuck with it only partially closed, ands it take like 10 tries to get it down. Annoying.

I had the idea to make shade another way and ordered up a can of black concrete stain at Home Devo. Did it last weekend, tested it Wednesday mid-morning in the bright sunlight. Working as intended, no more sudden door stoppages. (y)

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Round/revision #3. Garbage man took the spring and hook off (maybe an accident).🤦‍♂️

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It was wasn't the garage man, it was the skunks 🤪
 
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