Hitch/Towing Capacity confusion.

Guyute941

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So I thought all tremors were 15k capacity conventional towing. I got mine home and here is a pick of the receiver. Is this just the receiver rating and the actual tremor is 15k with 1500 tongue weight?
 

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So I thought all tremors were 15k capacity conventional towing. I got mine home and here is a pick of the receiver. Is this just the receiver rating and the actual tremor is 15k with 1500 tongue weight?
Yes, that’s just the receiver rating. The Ford towing guide is the source of truth for what the truck is as a whole and that specifies the Tremor at 15k conventional.
 
Yes, that’s just the receiver rating. The Ford towing guide is the source of truth for what the truck is as a whole and that specifies the Tremor at 15k conventional.
Thank you! Just drove over 500 miles there and back to get it - can’t put the literature down.
 
Thank you! Just drove over 500 miles there and back to get it - can’t put the literature down.
I'm working on a definitive guide to the ratings that I will post soon to address things like this, because it really can be confusing. But congrats on the new truck!
 
I'm working on a definitive guide to the ratings that I will post soon to address things like this, because it really can be confusing. But congrats on the new truck!
I’m sure everyone will appreciate that - and thank you - moved up from a 2019 F-350 to the 2021 250!
 
I'm working on a definitive guide to the ratings that I will post soon to address things like this, because it really can be confusing. But congrats on the new truck!
That would be great....I have a 2021 250 Tremor 3.55:1 Tremor axle ....... I also ordered the High Capacity Tow Package that adds some extra engine and trans cooling but also is said to upgrade the receiver to Class IV....the towing guide says it is limited to 15k but it seems like it could be a bit more ....what is the limiting factor ??? And what is the legal limit for conventional towing
 
Not sure if this helps.
 

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That would be great....I have a 2021 250 Tremor 3.55:1 Tremor axle ....... I also ordered the High Capacity Tow Package that adds some extra engine and trans cooling but also is said to upgrade the receiver to Class IV....the towing guide says it is limited to 15k but it seems like it could be a bit more ....what is the limiting factor ??? And what is the legal limit for conventional towing
My full detailed guide is here:


With that you can understand all of the numbers in detail, as well as learn how to find the numbers yourself in the towing guide.

@soop created a quick reference table if you just want the numbers:


I will quote myself from earlier today about what I believe the limiting factor is for the reduced conventional towing rating:

The theory I have is that the softer shocks combined with the lack of a rear sway bar and smaller front sway bar result in less stability. Means the trailer has a higher likelihood of pushing the truck around, particularly since the trucks are rated the same for weight distributed and non-weight distributed.

This is emphasized with conventional towing because the tongue weight is so far back.

Legal limit is three-fold:
  1. Whatever keeps you within your licensed weight. This may or may not correlate to GVWR depending on your state.
  2. Under 26,001 pounds combined GVWR unless you have a CDL, with an exception for RVs.
  3. Under GVWR, GAWR, and tire weight rating (remembering that tongue weight contributes to the weight on the truck) if you're concerned about liability should you be in an accident.
 
Not sure if this helps.
I would say that's only kind of useful. It lists the limits for the receiver itself, but that doesn't take into account the truck as a whole. The Tremor, for instance, is limited by other factors and has a towing capacity lower than the receiver.
 
If you wanted to tow 20k lbs conventional with a tremor it would be just fine if it's stock. I've towed more than that on a pintle hitch on mine. Towing 20k lbs on a gooseneck is a different story. It would be very easy to go over your payload and axle rating.
 
I have read several threads about F350 “Non-Tremor” compared to F350 Tremor towing. I am trying to extrapolate the simple difference in capacity being higher for the “Non-Tremor”. Bear with me and let me know if it is this simple: say for instance if I really needed to tow close to the 20,000 lbs. via bumper pull with a Tremor could I just change my wheels and tires from Tremor/All terrain /Mud, etc.. to Higher rated “Non-Tremor” wheels/tires and get the same performance? Basically having an extra set of tires for only the extremely heavy rows if needed and normal Tremor tires for most other things????

Is it really the tire rating that is the difference in the 5,000 lbs lower rating of the Tremor, all other truck parameters being the same. ???
 
I have read several threads about F350 “Non-Tremor” compared to F350 Tremor towing. I am trying to extrapolate the simple difference in capacity being higher for the “Non-Tremor”. Bear with me and let me know if it is this simple: say for instance if I really needed to tow close to the 20,000 lbs. via bumper pull with a Tremor could I just change my wheels and tires from Tremor/All terrain /Mud, etc.. to Higher rated “Non-Tremor” wheels/tires and get the same performance? Basically having an extra set of tires for only the extremely heavy rows if needed and normal Tremor tires for most other things????

Is it really the tire rating that is the difference in the 5,000 lbs lower rating of the Tremor, all other truck parameters being the same. ???
We don't know what all goes into the lower rating, though somewhere else on the forum (it was a while ago, so no way I can find it) we worked out that the tires are likely the largest contributing factor. Other factors could be the taller ride height and softer suspension.

Something to keep in mind with the tires is the height and tread pattern. The OEM Tremor tires have a very high load rating - far higher than the GVWR of a Tremor, at 4,000 pounds per tire. The reason the tires are a concern is stability. The super thick lugs, comparatively large voids, and additional sidewall all lead to less sheer stability. So if you really want to maximize your towing performance when towing, I would look into highway tires with a similar profile as the non-Tremor tires.

(To note: the tire profile is the second number in the tire size. The Tremor's - 285/75R18 - have a profile of 75, where the sidewall height is 75% of the 285mm width.)
 
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I'm working on a definitive guide to the ratings that I will post soon to address things like this, because it really can be confusing. But congrats on the new truck!
Btw, for this thread, there's two guides you want to look at. First, @soop's quick reference chart:


Second is the guide I did end up making which goes through the definitions of everything in detail, along with examples:

 
Yes, I have read and understand. I wanted to pull the Crayons out to see if I could contribute to make a simple thing out of charts so others and I could look at only the tire aspect. Let’s keep the good information flowing. 🇺🇸
 
So I thought all tremors were 15k capacity conventional towing. I got mine home and here is a pick of the receiver. Is this just the receiver rating and the actual tremor is 15k with 1500 tongue weight?
We don't know what all goes into the lower rating, though somewhere else on the forum (it was a while ago, so no way I can find it) we worked out that the tires are likely the largest contributing factor. Other factors could be the taller ride height and softer suspension.

Something to keep in mind with the tires is the height and tread pattern. The OEM Tremor tires have a very high load rating - far higher than the GVWR of a Tremor, at 4,000 pounds per tire. The reason the tires are a concern is stability. The super thick lugs, comparatively large voids, and additional sidewall all lead to less sheer stability. So if you really want to maximize your towing performance when towing, I would look into highway tires with a similar profile as the non-Tremor tires.

(To note: the tire profile is the second number in the tire size. The Tremor's - 285/75R18 - have a profile of 75, where the sidewall height is 75% of the 285mm width.)
I've done a fair amount of research regarding this area of concern. The Tremor comes with the 4 inch axle coupled with very heavy springs. The issues appears to be the balloon type tires. The tires have plenty of capacity but since the sidewall is increased they seems to de-rate the tongue pull due to the lack of "stiffness" and sway during driving. Ford seems to de-rate due to handling concerns and not actual mechancal capacity. Additionally, the rear axle is NOT equipped with a sway bar! I've measured the axle, springs and shocks on both the 250 and 350 and have found no difference. So it seems to really come down to how chose to rate it in the tongue pull mode!!
 
I've done a fair amount of research regarding this area of concern. The Tremor comes with the 4 inch axle coupled with very heavy springs. The issues appears to be the balloon type tires. The tires have plenty of capacity but since the sidewall is increased they seems to de-rate the tongue pull due to the lack of "stiffness" and sway during driving. Ford seems to de-rate due to handling concerns and not actual mechancal capacity. Additionally, the rear axle is NOT equipped with a sway bar! I've measured the axle, springs and shocks on both the 250 and 350 and have found no difference. So it seems to really come down to how chose to rate it in the tongue pull mode!!

The lack of sway bar is because it's on "off road" truck. Sway bars limit articulation.
 
The lack of sway bar is because it's on "off road" truck. Sway bars limit articulation.
True, though I believe Super Duty’s come by default with no rear sway bar and only certain packages add one. Not familiar enough to know which ones.
 
True, though I believe Super Duty’s come by default with no rear sway bar and only certain packages add one. Not familiar enough to know which ones.

Fair point.
 
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The lack of sway bar is because it's on "off road" truck. Sway bars limit articulation.
yes...very true!!! In fact the Jeep Rubicon has a front sway bar that is electronically disconnected with a cab switch...... no sway bar works great off road but is a negative when a load is moving the rear end from side to side...it is about compromise
 
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