Diesel Owners - Do you shut your truck off when filling up?

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When refueling with diesel, do you shut your truck off?
 

Sludgemonkey44

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To add to that question, what situations do you shut her down as opposed to let it diesel (idle). Examples, going into convenience store or bank, going grocery shopping, loading a trailer etc. I’m new to the diesel world and I see guys out and about doing various things as far as timing for shut offs. Also, can anyone explain the benefits to leaving running as opposed to shutting off when stopping? Any help is greatly appreciated!
 

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This is an interesting topic, why not shut it off?
 

Vrybusy

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I typically shut mine off all of the time for gas, store runs (even short ones), etc... If it's hot out or I've been running for a long time (road trip), I let it idle for a bit and then shut it off and go about my business. If you want your truck to be there when you return, at least in several areas around my way, you will shut it off too! HA!
 

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If it's -30 -40 -50 then no i don't turn it off. There will be a parking lot with Diesel trucks idling at the stores. Diesels dont like cold.
 

TxTremor

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My experience is mostly with agriculture and construction diesels but still applies, I think. Older diesels were much more friendly to longer idling, however newer diesels with the emissions you need to be careful with extended idles. To help keep the emissions systems clean its best to keep the engine hot/working, when an engine is not getting up to temp is when build up occurs (like short trips, long idle, etc). With my newer equipment, Tier 4, we warm the equipment up for about 5 minutes prior to work and a 5 minute cool down before shutdown, with a shut down if the break is longer than 15 minutes. In the winter we move warm up closer to 10 minutes, cool down is still 5 minutes, but if it is colder than normal we will allow the equipment to idle up to 30 minutes if we expect to resume work within that window. Every mechanic I have talked with say the same thing, the new diesel engines need to be working and to limit unneeded idling as much as possible. Short idles or longer if it is particularly cold should be fine but long idles can actually be harmful to the system.
 

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Never costs more to start than to leave it run.
 

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My experience is mostly with agriculture and construction diesels but still applies, I think. Older diesels were much more friendly to longer idling, however newer diesels with the emissions you need to be careful with extended idles. To help keep the emissions systems clean its best to keep the engine hot/working, when an engine is not getting up to temp is when build up occurs (like short trips, long idle, etc). With my newer equipment, Tier 4, we warm the equipment up for about 5 minutes prior to work and a 5 minute cool down before shutdown, with a shut down if the break is longer than 15 minutes. In the winter we move warm up closer to 10 minutes, cool down is still 5 minutes, but if it is colder than normal we will allow the equipment to idle up to 30 minutes if we expect to resume work within that window. Every mechanic I have talked with say the same thing, the new diesel engines need to be working and to limit unneeded idling as much as possible. Short idles or longer if it is particularly cold should be fine but long idles can actually be harmful to the system.
Thank you! That explication makes perfect sense. Exactly what I was looking for.
 

davidb1841

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Yes!
 

HeavyAssault

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These newer trucks can be shut down so it's not an issue. It's going to be owner's discretion as to IF they leave it running, or if they shut it down.

Everyone will have $.02 to share about this subject.
 

DanMan583

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When refueling with diesel, do you shut your truck off?
Also if you’ve been pulling a heavy trailer at highway speeds and you just need to stop for Fuel, it is best to let the truck idle to let the Turbo cool down. The Turbo is cooled by the flow of oil and if the truck is idling then oil is flowing into the Turbo thus helping it to cool down. We use a similar approach for large industrial Diesel Generators, after a we run one with a load we have them set up with a 5 minute cool down timer specifically to let the Turbos cool down. Also there’s not much harm in letting the engine idle if you are just stopping for fuel as the compression ratio is so high at idle that it burns very little fuel. And there is no danger of fumes igniting like there is with gasoline. But as another posted, I would avoid long extended periods of idling due to the newer emissions equipment.
I hope that helps.
 

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Good question. Thanks for the info.
 

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I don't for preventative reasons , it's to prevent my fat ass from going in the store and buying a Slurpee and and a handful of candy bars.
 

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Interesting answers.......

Keep air condition on, extreme cold. I like the input.

I am in the habit of turning it off.

However on my long and hot road trip
I let it idle and cool off for a few minutes before shutting it off. We were driving many hours between fill ups so the break was nice.

I was also told not to shut it down high up in the mountains. There are times we sat for 15-20 minutes waiting for construction vehicles and traffic at high altitudes. ( another topic I guess)

Talking fill ups with diesel, in winter I never go lower than a half tank.
 

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I shut mine off, unless I am running it hard, such as towing or on a long trip. I will then let it idle, when refueling.
 
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