Badland 3-Ton Off-Road Jack Mount and Cover

TremorHauler

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I finally got around to mounting my Harbor Freight Badland 3 Ton Off-Road Jack in the bed of my truck. Here's what I bought...
Badland 3 Ton Off-Road Jack (use coupons): https://www.harborfreight.com/brands/badland/3-ton-off-road-jack-59136.html
Mount: HDS Engineering BadLand 3 Ton Jack Mount: https://hds-engineering.com/shop/ols/products/badland-jack-mount/v/12001-01-BLC-PWD
Cover: Grove Fabworks BadLand Jack Cover: https://grovefabworks.com/shop/ols/products/badland-jack-cover

I went with this solution after I blew a tire and used the Ford supplied jack. It worked fine but was a hassle and only offered a minimal surface making it tenuous. Fortunately, I was on a flat surface. It reminded me that if I were offloading, I may not be as lucky with the same jack on an uneven surface. Because I regularly tow, I chose to mount the jack in the front part of the bed parallel to the cab. I mounted it on the passenger side, only so that I didn't have to worry about drilling through the bed on the driver side where the gas tank resides underneath. I mounted the jack with 3M thin rubber pads between the bottom of the jack mount and the bed. I figure this will reduce vibration between the bottom of the mount and the bed-liner. I used nylon nuts, in addition to locking washers. I also taped Guerrilla Tape to the bottom on the part where it contacts the bed-liner.

Note that the HDS Engineering solution is extremely well made and has a tight fit. I had to remove a washer from one of the rear wheels of the jack for it to snap in to the spring-loaded pin. Otherwise it wouldn't push down all the way in to the mount. Even then it's a tight fit but shouldn't be loose al all anyway. Also, the jack handles strap under the jack. The straps were difficult to clip the first time but having used them a couple times they have loosened up just enough to make it easy. This snug fit is by-design so that the jack or the poles don't rattle. Additionally, I wanted something that would protect the jack from dirt and other elements. The Grove Fabworks jack cover exceeds my expectations. I knew it was a little more than I wanted to afford but also knew that it was made by off-road guys who knew how to protect things that are exposed to the elements. In all, if you're looking for a heavy duty jack to bring with you, I highly recommend this setup.


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I finally got around to mounting my Harbor Freight Badland 3 Ton Off-Road Jack in the bed of my truck. Here's what I bought...
Badland 3 Ton Off-Road Jack (use coupons): https://www.harborfreight.com/brands/badland/3-ton-off-road-jack-59136.html
Mount: HDS Engineering BadLand 3 Ton Jack Mount: https://hds-engineering.com/shop/ols/products/badland-jack-mount/v/12001-01-BLC-PWD
Cover: Grove Fabworks BadLand Jack Cover: https://grovefabworks.com/shop/ols/products/badland-jack-cover

I went with this solution after I blew a tire and used the Ford supplied jack. It worked fine but was a hassle and only offered a minimal surface making it tenuous. Fortunately, I was on a flat surface. It reminded me that if I were offloading, I may not be as lucky with the same jack on an uneven surface. Because I regularly tow, I chose to mount the jack in the front part of the bed parallel to the cab. I mounted it on the passenger side, only so that I didn't have to worry about drilling through the bed on the driver side where the gas tank resides underneath. I mounted the jack with 3M thin rubber pads between the bottom of the jack mount and the bed. I figure this will reduce vibration between the bottom of the mount and the bed-liner. I used nylon nuts, in addition to locking washers. I also taped Guerrilla Tape to the bottom on the part where it contacts the bed-liner.

Note that the HDS Engineering solution is extremely well made and has a tight fit. I had to remove a washer from one of the rear wheels of the jack for it to snap in to the spring-loaded pin. Otherwise it wouldn't push down all the way in to the mount. Even then it's a tight fit but shouldn't be loose al all anyway. Also, the jack handles strap under the jack. The straps were difficult to clip the first time but having used them a couple times they have loosened up just enough to make it easy. This snug fit is by-design so that the jack or the poles don't rattle. Additionally, I wanted something that would protect the jack from dirt and other elements. The Grove Fabworks jack cover exceeds my expectations. I knew it was a little more than I wanted to afford but also knew that it was made by off-road guys who knew how to protect things that are exposed to the elements. In all, if you're looking for a heavy duty jack to bring with you, I highly recommend this setup.


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Very nice! I like that cover and may have to order one...
 
I still find this floor jack overly priced for just 3 tons.

I have The Sergeant off road kit 12 ton bottle jack that I've yet to use and comes in a military style ammo box neatly packed with a maximum lifting range of 27"
 
I still find this floor jack overly priced for just 3 tons.

I have The Sergeant off road kit 12 ton bottle jack that I've yet to use and comes in a military style ammo box neatly packed with a maximum lifting range of 27"

I use my badlands in the garage all the time. Rolls so easy and I don't have to get down under anything to jack it up. It's a very well thought out jack even for a knock off.

On the trail I prefer a bottle jack for space though.
 
Mounted my Pro Eagle in the same spot. Works great in that location.
Thanks for sharing.
 
Sweet jack! And very nice mount and cover too! 👍
 
Similar here ,I ratchet strapped it to the front of the bed.
 
I finally got around to mounting my Harbor Freight Badland 3 Ton Off-Road Jack in the bed of my truck. Here's what I bought...
Badland 3 Ton Off-Road Jack (use coupons): https://www.harborfreight.com/brands/badland/3-ton-off-road-jack-59136.html
Mount: HDS Engineering BadLand 3 Ton Jack Mount: https://hds-engineering.com/shop/ols/products/badland-jack-mount/v/12001-01-BLC-PWD
Cover: Grove Fabworks BadLand Jack Cover: https://grovefabworks.com/shop/ols/products/badland-jack-cover

I went with this solution after I blew a tire and used the Ford supplied jack. It worked fine but was a hassle and only offered a minimal surface making it tenuous. Fortunately, I was on a flat surface. It reminded me that if I were offloading, I may not be as lucky with the same jack on an uneven surface. Because I regularly tow, I chose to mount the jack in the front part of the bed parallel to the cab. I mounted it on the passenger side, only so that I didn't have to worry about drilling through the bed on the driver side where the gas tank resides underneath. I mounted the jack with 3M thin rubber pads between the bottom of the jack mount and the bed. I figure this will reduce vibration between the bottom of the mount and the bed-liner. I used nylon nuts, in addition to locking washers. I also taped Guerrilla Tape to the bottom on the part where it contacts the bed-liner.

Note that the HDS Engineering solution is extremely well made and has a tight fit. I had to remove a washer from one of the rear wheels of the jack for it to snap in to the spring-loaded pin. Otherwise it wouldn't push down all the way in to the mount. Even then it's a tight fit but shouldn't be loose al all anyway. Also, the jack handles strap under the jack. The straps were difficult to clip the first time but having used them a couple times they have loosened up just enough to make it easy. This snug fit is by-design so that the jack or the poles don't rattle. Additionally, I wanted something that would protect the jack from dirt and other elements. The Grove Fabworks jack cover exceeds my expectations. I knew it was a little more than I wanted to afford but also knew that it was made by off-road guys who knew how to protect things that are exposed to the elements. In all, if you're looking for a heavy duty jack to bring with you, I highly recommend this setup.


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I also have the Badlands, but purchased the Grove powder coated mount/cradle & cover. Not a fan of bottle jack on uneven surface, or crawling under truck with sticker burrs etc to correctly position the jack.
 
I also have the Badlands, but purchased the Grove powder coated mount/cradle & cover. Not a fan of bottle jack on uneven surface, or crawling under truck with sticker burrs etc to correctly position the jack.
Bottle jacks suck on anything but flat surfaces.
 
I finally got around to mounting my Harbor Freight Badland 3 Ton Off-Road Jack in the bed of my truck. Here's what I bought...
Badland 3 Ton Off-Road Jack (use coupons): https://www.harborfreight.com/brands/badland/3-ton-off-road-jack-59136.html
Mount: HDS Engineering BadLand 3 Ton Jack Mount: https://hds-engineering.com/shop/ols/products/badland-jack-mount/v/12001-01-BLC-PWD
Cover: Grove Fabworks BadLand Jack Cover: https://grovefabworks.com/shop/ols/products/badland-jack-cover

I went with this solution after I blew a tire and used the Ford supplied jack. It worked fine but was a hassle and only offered a minimal surface making it tenuous. Fortunately, I was on a flat surface. It reminded me that if I were offloading, I may not be as lucky with the same jack on an uneven surface. Because I regularly tow, I chose to mount the jack in the front part of the bed parallel to the cab. I mounted it on the passenger side, only so that I didn't have to worry about drilling through the bed on the driver side where the gas tank resides underneath. I mounted the jack with 3M thin rubber pads between the bottom of the jack mount and the bed. I figure this will reduce vibration between the bottom of the mount and the bed-liner. I used nylon nuts, in addition to locking washers. I also taped Guerrilla Tape to the bottom on the part where it contacts the bed-liner.

Note that the HDS Engineering solution is extremely well made and has a tight fit. I had to remove a washer from one of the rear wheels of the jack for it to snap in to the spring-loaded pin. Otherwise it wouldn't push down all the way in to the mount. Even then it's a tight fit but shouldn't be loose al all anyway. Also, the jack handles strap under the jack. The straps were difficult to clip the first time but having used them a couple times they have loosened up just enough to make it easy. This snug fit is by-design so that the jack or the poles don't rattle. Additionally, I wanted something that would protect the jack from dirt and other elements. The Grove Fabworks jack cover exceeds my expectations. I knew it was a little more than I wanted to afford but also knew that it was made by off-road guys who knew how to protect things that are exposed to the elements. In all, if you're looking for a heavy duty jack to bring with you, I highly recommend this setup.


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Looks great! Did you pay $299 for the jack? I don't see any additional coupons to take it below that, Thanks!
 
What am i missing here. $250 for the floor “solution” which is more expensive than the Badland jack itself when HF coupons are used?
 
What am i missing here. $250 for the floor “solution” which is more expensive than the Badland jack itself when HF coupons are used?
I want to say I paid around $240 for the Jack. I signed up for the Harbor Freight membership, which gave me discounts and there was also a Badland promotion going that offered a discount on all Badland items. I think it was around this time of year. If I had bought a $599 ProEagle, would have spent $599 + a similar jack mount system and cover, which would have brought me closer to $1000 for the setup.

I think of it as the tool you have is the best tool. If I can mount a jack, that is one of the most common things I can lend a hand with or use myself, it's worthwhile carrying it with me when I don't have to worry about it breaking other things in the bed of my truck. Straps would have been a great option, and obviously much less expensive.
 
What am i missing here. $250 for the floor “solution” which is more expensive than the Badland jack itself when HF coupons are used?
Just throw it in a rubber made box with some tow straps, be a heck of allot cheaper and easier.
 
I still find this floor jack overly priced for just 3 tons.

I have The Sergeant off road kit 12 ton bottle jack that I've yet to use and comes in a military style ammo box neatly packed with a maximum lifting range of 27"
I agree. I looked at a pro eagle, but that’s allot of coin for a Chinese jack. I’ll take a look at the sergeant, thanks.
 
I want to say I paid around $240 for the Jack. I signed up for the Harbor Freight membership, which gave me discounts and there was also a Badland promotion going that offered a discount on all Badland items. I think it was around this time of year. If I had bought a $599 ProEagle, would have spent $599 + a similar jack mount system and cover, which would have brought me closer to $1000 for the setup.

I think of it as the tool you have is the best tool. If I can mount a jack, that is one of the most common things I can lend a hand with or use myself, it's worthwhile carrying it with me when I don't have to worry about it breaking other things in the bed of my truck. Straps would have been a great option, and obviously much less expensive.

I don’t disagree it’s a great jack and i love mine. But I situated mine for free and it hasn’t shifted an inch in the last 3 months. The wheels are in the bag next to it. Sometimes the best solution is also a cost effective one.
 

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I’m not sure why everyone buys a floor jack.. bottle jack works better 99% of the time
I have not found that to be the case when offroad. This is my first 3/4 ton, but I blew several tires on my Raptor and it seemed to always happen around softer or uneven surfaces. The ProEagle and now Badlands (and whatever one at Northern Tool) make it much easier to lift the truck safely and also hit whatever lift point you need due to terrain.
 
I have not found that to be the case when offroad. This is my first 3/4 ton, but I blew several tires on my Raptor and it seemed to always happen around softer or uneven surfaces. The ProEagle and now Badlands (and whatever one at Northern Tool) make it much easier to lift the truck safely and also hit whatever lift point you need due to terrain.
A bottle jack does that so much easier. There’s a reason why rock crawlers carry bottle jacks as they are literally on the most uneven terrain.
Getting any floor jack to be efficient on uneven terrain is a struggle with offset and leaning.
 
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