6.7 steering???

JimmyG79

Tremor Fiend
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Macomb, MI
Yeah, I have a whopping 25 miles on the odometer but.... steering feels like I’m almost driving a tractor. For instance, I’m at a light and take a right turn. After completing the turn I need to give it a little left input to get it to straighten out. Usually you make a turn, complete the turn and let the pressure off the wheel and the truck wants to straighten out. Is this normal and if so, I don’t like it.
 
Yeah, I have a whopping 25 miles on the odometer but.... steering feels like I’m almost driving a tractor. For instance, I’m at a light and take a right turn. After completing the turn I need to give it a little left input to get it to straighten out. Usually you make a turn, complete the turn and let the pressure off the wheel and the truck wants to straighten out. Is this normal and if so, I don’t like it.
Mine is that way as well. It’s pretty normal for a recirculating ball steering system. They try to strike a balance on the mesh load between too tight (have to pull it to center) and too loose (vague). If it really bothers you, there are some alignment changes that can be made to improve it but they will impact other ride and handling characteristics.
 
Normal for these trucks. Some big tires to turn. Haven’t put my physics knowledge to work in years... but I believe it’s due to the large diameter tire. Our tires are spinning much slower than the average tire and have a large contact area. Both restrict the turning ability of the wheel. Picture driving a car with no power steering. Nearly impossible to turn the wheel unless you are moving. Still difficult at slow speeds. Faster you go, easier to turn because the wheel is spinning faster and doesn’t have to overcome a rotational skid (picture the mark left on your driveway if you turn the wheel lock to lock without moving) The castor alignment adjustment creates geometry in the front steering that allows the tire to naturally want to face forward when driving forward. If you take your hands off the wheel, the vehicle will still go straight, but more importantly so you aren’t fighting the steering just to go down a straight road and best for tire wear and overall handling. Try driving in reverse at 25mph. The steering will feel very squirrelly. Cannot have the perfect geometry for both directions. That same geometry designed to keep your wheel straight has to overcome the friction of our large tire contact area and the fact that our tires spin at a slower rate at any given speed. Need a ton of caster alignment adjustment to get them to come back fully on their own at slow speeds but like previous poster said, that can create other issues. And that may not even be enough to get the desired result. Open to fact checking if I got any of that wrong. Always trying to learn too.

Turned out to be a much longer answer than I anticipated. Here was my original answer: I got used to it quick. Haven’t thought about it since I passed 100 miles. ?
 
I noticed this when I got my truck since I was coming from a 2019 f-150. After a couple weeks of driving I’m so used to the new steering I don’t even think twice about it now.

For what it’s worth, I don’t think the tire makes a huge difference. I had 33” KO2s on my f-150. My guess is that the big difference is the lack of full electronic steering on the super duty.
 
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Guys,

I was thinking the same thing but finally had to get her looked at when i had to do a 27 point turnaround in a parking lot the other day. It was embarrassing. Turns out the power steering line gets a kink in it and is delaminated. At lower RPM it is creating a restriction on the pump. My dealer just ordered me a new line and pump covered by the warranty.
 
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