2021 F350 6.7L- Breaking in before towing

Ruby491

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I have an F350 arriving next month & also am planning a couple camping trips. How many miles are sufficient until I can start towing a 10,000 pound toy hauler?
 
The owners manual says no towing and to vary the rpms somewhere below 50% of red line (no cruise control essentially) for the first 1000 miles to make sure the rings seat properly.

Is this overkill? Probably. Will it work? Likely. It’s what I did with both my truck and my wife’s Audi which has the same procedure listed in the manual. No issues with either yet.

Edit: Here is the exact wording...

“You need to break in new tires for approximately 300 mi (480 km). During this time, your vehicle may exhibit some unusual driving characteristics.
Avoid driving too fast during the first 1000 mi (1,600 km). Vary your speed frequently and change up through the gears early. Do not labor the engine.
Drive your new vehicle at least 1000 mi (1,600 km) before towing a trailer. Make sure you use the specified engine oil. See Capacities and Specifications - 6.2L.
Do not add friction modifier compounds or special break-in oils during the first few thousand miles (kilometers) of operation. These additives may prevent piston ring seating.”
 
The owners manual says no towing and to vary the rpms somewhere below 50% of red line (no cruise control essentially) for the first 1000 miles to make sure the rings seat properly.

Is this overkill? Probably. Will it work? Likely. It’s what I did with both my truck and my wife’s Audi which has the same procedure listed in the manual. No issues with either yet.
engine break in is incredibly controversial. I always try to follow manufacturer recommendations but this question starts fights on forums lol. Some people insist that "thrashing" a new engine will immediately seat the rings and prevent any chance for blow by and they have data to back it up. On the other hand, if you have a major engine failure and they plug your truck or motorcycle or whatever into the computer and see you thrashed it against the owner's manual recommendations, they have an easy out to void your warranty claim.

When my ducati was puking oil at 500 miles and ultimately Ducati replaced the entire bike, I was glad I had stayed within the break in guidelines.
 
first 1000 miles will come up fast. Then the best thing is to put a load on that 6.7

I did my first oil change at 1500 miles then started to pull my 5th wheel.

by the way 10,000 for a toy hauler??? I thought they were a lot heaver.
 
first 1000 miles will come up fast. Then the best thing is to put a load on that 6.7

I did my first oil change at 1500 miles then started to pull my 5th wheel.

by the way 10,000 for a toy hauler??? I thought they were a lot heaver.
It’s a small 27’ bumper pull. Something like 7,300 lbs dry. Side by side adds another couple pounds. 10k was just my conversation starter.
 
The owners manual says no towing and to vary the rpms somewhere below 50% of red line (no cruise control essentially) for the first 1000 miles to make sure the rings seat properly.

Is this overkill? Probably. Will it work? Likely. It’s what I did with both my truck and my wife’s Audi which has the same procedure listed in the manual. No issues with either yet.

Edit: Here is the exact wording...

“You need to break in new tires for approximately 300 mi (480 km). During this time, your vehicle may exhibit some unusual driving characteristics.
Avoid driving too fast during the first 1000 mi (1,600 km). Vary your speed frequently and change up through the gears early. Do not labor the engine.
Drive your new vehicle at least 1000 mi (1,600 km) before towing a trailer. Make sure you use the specified engine oil. See Capacities and Specifications - 6.2L.
Do not add friction modifier compounds or special break-in oils during the first few thousand miles (kilometers) of operation. These additives may prevent piston ring seating.”
Great info thanks!!
 
engine break in is incredibly controversial. I always try to follow manufacturer recommendations but this question starts fights on forums lol. Some people insist that "thrashing" a new engine will immediately seat the rings and prevent any chance for blow by and they have data to back it up. On the other hand, if you have a major engine failure and they plug your truck or motorcycle or whatever into the computer and see you thrashed it against the owner's manual recommendations, they have an easy out to void your warranty claim.

When my ducati was puking oil at 500 miles and ultimately Ducati replaced the entire bike, I was glad I had stayed within the break in guidelines.
Great advise, thanks!
 
engine break in is incredibly controversial. I always try to follow manufacturer recommendations but this question starts fights on forums lol. Some people insist that "thrashing" a new engine will immediately seat the rings and prevent any chance for blow by and they have data to back it up. On the other hand, if you have a major engine failure and they plug your truck or motorcycle or whatever into the computer and see you thrashed it against the owner's manual recommendations, they have an easy out to void your warranty claim.

When my ducati was puking oil at 500 miles and ultimately Ducati replaced the entire bike, I was glad I had stayed within the break in guidelines.
Ducati.....nice bikes
 
My new truck (2022 F-350 SRW Diesel) is being build this week. This is my first Ford diesel. I am currently driving a 2003 Dodge 3500 with a 5.9 Cummins. I have 209,000 mile on my truck and I can pull my dipstick out after 5000 miles on an oil change and still see the dipstick through the oil. It not clear but no where even near to black. I am planning the same break in procedure on my new truck and the same oil change procedure.
On my Dodge I used standard 15W-40 oil for the first 60,000 miles. Made the first change at 1000 then every following 3000 miles to the 60,000 mile mark. Did not tow any heavy loads until after 20,000 miles. At 60,000 miles I went to Synthetic either Mobil one or Shell Rotella. Oil changs now at 7500 miles. Never used any oil filter that the Dodge OEM ones. I buy the by the case on Ebay for $6.00 verses $17.00 at the dealer. I believe Dodge ones are made by Fleet Guard.
Have any of you Ford Diesel had the same results and what was your break in process? Are the Ford OEM oil filters good?
 
The owners manual says no towing and to vary the rpms somewhere below 50% of red line (no cruise control essentially) for the first 1000 miles to make sure the rings seat properly.

Is this overkill? Probably. Will it work? Likely. It’s what I did with both my truck and my wife’s Audi which has the same procedure listed in the manual. No issues with either yet.

Edit: Here is the exact wording...

“You need to break in new tires for approximately 300 mi (480 km). During this time, your vehicle may exhibit some unusual driving characteristics.
Avoid driving too fast during the first 1000 mi (1,600 km). Vary your speed frequently and change up through the gears early. Do not labor the engine.
Drive your new vehicle at least 1000 mi (1,600 km) before towing a trailer. Make sure you use the specified engine oil. See Capacities and Specifications - 6.2L.
Do not add friction modifier compounds or special break-in oils during the first few thousand miles (kilometers) of operation. These additives may prevent piston ring seating.”
I did a short tow with hay at 2400 miles, and changed the oil at 3,000. I know that was slightly early, but I am a bit anal about it. Now I will go to 5K, and I will not hesitate on towing.

It's interesting regarding the red line. I have not ever come close to that. The truck seems like the sleepy giant for the most part, and I have been super easy on it. Just put the pedal monster on it, and that was the first time I felt the "sporty" truck come alive! Back to running stock, though. lol
 
I've always been in camp hard break-in, definitely not thrashing anything I think that is a mis-representation. In an ideal scenario I'd take a new engine under moderate load smoothly through a reasonable RPM range in different gears. Stopping every 15-20 minutes or so to let the vehicle fully cool down and then repeating.

On manuals I like to drive hills where you can accelerate hard up and then engine break down.

That's how I break in gas cars and motorcycles, I've never owned a diesel, but I personally would prefer to have maybe 3-5k lbs to tow for break in to create a light-moderate load condition.
 
Per Ford - 1,000 miles of break in prior to towing.

Compliments of Member Scottk - from another thread:

Page 373 of the 2022 Owners manual says:
BREAKING-IN
Your vehicle requires a break-in period. For
the first 1,000 mi (1,600 km), avoid driving
at high speeds, heavy braking, aggressive
shifting or using your vehicle to tow. During
this time, your vehicle may exhibit some
unusual driving characteristics.
 
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